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  • Articles, GirlSpring.com, Tips

    8 Things to do This Summer when You’re Bored!

     

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    I know you’ve been looking forward to it alllll year long, but now that it’s here you don’t know what to do!  Regardless if you’re taking classes, working, or staying busy- summer definitely allows more free time than the rest of the year. If you’re struggling on what to do this summer and find yourself bored one day, try one of these simple yet fun activities!

    1. Get some exercise! Whether it be walking through your neighborhood, buying a gym membership, or finding a new trail to run on, exercise can be a good hobby to pick up over the summertime. You’d be amazed how much better you feel about yourself if you just start walking around your neighborhood a couple of times a week. Plus having quiet time yourself is a must over the summer!
    2. Read a new book! Or an old book. Or a book you’ve already read 5 times! Even if you have summer reading assignments, getting on top of them early in the summer will make the rest of your summer less stressful! Go to a bookstore and find one that speaks to you and dive into it!
    3. Write in a journal. Sure, it seems old-fashioned, but writing your thoughts down can be extremely helpful and therapeutic to some people! Plus, this way you can go back in a couple of months (or a couple of years!) and read the exact way you were feeling, in your own words. Pretty cool!
    4. Make goals for the upcoming school year! Whether it be doing more homework, studying more, finding new friends, or whatever you want, try to write out some goals you have for the upcoming school year! This way, once summer ends, you will be right on track for the beginning of the new school year.
    5. Explore your city! This can be an adventure you can take with your parents, siblings, or friends! Try and visit somewhere (even if it’s just to eat) that you’ve never been to before! You never know what you might find!
    6. Find a new hobby! Try and find an activity this summer that you really enjoy doing! It could be collecting items, scrapbooking, or even a new sport! You have time to work on it all summer, and then if it is a hobby you can bring into your school life, you’ll be prepared once school rolls around! If it is a sport, buy some practice equipment and get the best you can during the summer months so that you’ll do great in school tryouts!
    7. Try a new recipe! This one can be a little bit more tricky than the others, but still fun! Get on pinterest and see if you can find any cool recipes that stick out to you. Then, go with your mom to the grocery store and let her help you find the needed ingredients! Come back home and try to make a new recipe! Just remember, even if you mess up, it’ll be a memory!
    8. And last but not least… Nothing! If you can’t find anything to do this summer and find yourself bored, just try to soak it all in! For the rest of the year you’ll have school and holidays and you’ll be non-stop busy! Giving yourself time to relax, even when you’re bored, can be a good thing. Just think once school starts how much you’ll wish you were bored!
  • Cooking, Health, Healthy Eating, Tips

    5 Tips On How To Eat Healthy

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    You’ve heard of em. The Atkins Diet. The Zone Diet. Vegetarian Diet. Vegan Diet. Weight Watchers Diet. South Beach Diet. Raw Food Diet. Mediterranean Diet. With all these different types of diets, it can be overwhelming and hard to choose! But don’t worry- I’m here to help. The diet I think you should be on? None of them. I don’t think you should be on a diet! I think you should feed your body with things that are good for it- not that punish it. Too often, young girls get caught up in dieting because they feel this is the only way to get healthy! But that’s far from the truth. Here’s 4 tips on how to eat healthy- without the diet.

    1. Eat clean

    The hardest part about eating healthy is actually doing it. Once you’ve started eating healthy and you see the way your body looks, and the way your body feels, it becomes much, much easier. So, what exactly does eating clean mean? It means nourishing  your body with foods that will help it, not hinder it. I know Mcdonalds is good. I know how addicting a bag of chips is. I know how good cheese is.. trust me. But these foods will not help your body!

     

    1. Drink (lots of!) water

    One of the hardest things for me is drinking water throughout the day. Did you know you should be drinking half a gallon on water.. per day? Especially in the summer heat, water intake is essential to your health. Drinking water may not be the most exciting thing- but the positive affects it has on your body are amazing!

     

    1. Focus on on quality, not quantity

    A myth about eating right is that you have to eat a lot less- which is NOT true! Don’t worry too much about how much you’re eating, worry about what you’re eating. When you decide to eat healthy, you shouldn’t be hungry all the time! You can eat as much as you used to- just make sure it’s healthy food.

    1. Find foods you like

    It’s important to find healthy foods that you like, so that you aren’t constantly eating food you don’t want to be eating. This summer, experiment and find some healthy foods and recipes that you can try that will fuel your body! A good place to find healthy meals is Pinterest, which you can follow us on!

        5. Keep everything in moderation 

    If you decide to eat healthy, your life is not over. You can still have everything you want- just be sure to keep it in moderation! Don’t look at foods like desserts as bad for you, because you will feel guilty every time you splurge and have one. Treat yourself to some pizza, brownies, or ice-cream- just don’t make it every meal! If you keep everything in balance, you won’t feel guilty for anything you eat.

  • College, Tips

    Student Advice on Freshman Year

    Gain helpful student advice on freshman year from students nationwide, who share their personal experiences.

    College life is looming. Wouldn’t it be nice to get some pointers on making the most of college?

    Fastweb polled students across the country for their top tips for a successful freshman year in college.

    What tips do students across the nation have for students about to go to college? Find out below!

    Getting Settled

    “Talk to your roommate before you get to school and decide who’s bringing what (you don’t need two stereos…).”
    Tina, Dartmouth College

    “Even if you really miss your home or your parents want you to come back, don’t do it until it has been at least a month since you were in college. The people who leave before then never feel like they have a foothold on college life, and end up leaving.”
    Kristen, Cal Poly

    “Splurge on organizing materials—for your dorm, for your backpack, for all your papers. This is the most important thing you can do in order to preserve sanity as you find your free time slowly slipping away.”
    Andrea, Harold Washington City College

    “Make friends with an older student who has already been through freshman year and can help make your first year easier.”
    David, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Classwork/Academics

    “Don’t sweat the grades. If you put in an honest, diligent effort and are truly engaged in your work, then you’ll be fine. If studying a certain subject is like pulling teeth or is the last thing you want to do, then something’s wrong. If this subject is your major, then something is very wrong.”
    Seth, Brown University

    “Go to class—it is SO tempting to miss class and get another student’s notes, but you’ll definitely miss out.”
    David

    “Get to know your professors. It’s not high school anymore. Your classes can be 300+ and your professors will not come to you; you must come to them. Get to know them because they are your most valuable resources for academics and for extracurricular professional opportunities.”
    Matt, Stanford University

    “Don’t depend on the teacher to remind you about due dates.”
    Elizabeth, Sam Houston State University

    “Follow of the honor code—cheating is not worth it!”
    David

    “Take different classes. Even if you know what you want to major in, most students end up changing their major sometime during their college careers. Learn new things and open yourself up to a whole new future.”
    Andy, Gordon College

    “Don’t be afraid to ask questions … especially in class or afterwards. No college professor is going to turn you away. He/she may not have the time to lead you through the problem, but they can, and most of the time will, lead you in the right direction.”
    Andy

    “Don’t be afraid to take challenging, upper level courses. What’s important is one-on-one contact with a teacher and highly motivated students, something you’ll only get in smaller classes. This means getting over the fear of looking ignorant and realizing that everyone’s a novice at some point.”
    Seth

    Extracurriculars

    “Become involved in several community service activities and extra-curricular activities/clubs so you can become an integral part in the campus.”
    David

    “Don’t sacrifice quality for quantity in terms of what you get involved in. You’ll always want to do more than what you have time for, so limit your commitments to what you can really get deeply engaged in.”
    Seth

    “Keep up a hobby—dance class, computer games, pottery. Whatever outlet you have for creative energy or frustration, keep it up during your college experience.”
    Andrea

    “Learn to manage your time. Even if you’re the type that doesn’t do a bit of studying until 20 minutes before an exam, you need to budget your time at college between classes, activities and socializing. If you spend all your time at the library, you won’t appreciate college very much; but the same goes for the scenario in which you spend your whole college career hanging over the balcony of a house with Greek letters painted on the side.”
    Terri, College of William and Mary

    “Go to every job fair, information session and industry banquet. Most of the time, that is how you get jobs before and after college.”
    Kristen

    Dorm or Apartment Life

    “Make friends with your residential assistant. They can be really helpful and you never know when you will need them (e.g., for roommate problems, advice on picking classes, etc.).”
    Tina

    “Learn to say “No.” Mom and Dad are miles away now, and there’s no one to stand up for you but you. If you roommate constantly takes your favorite clothes without asking or if the girl down the hall always disturbs your studies with her annoying loud conversations, speak up! You have your rights.”
    Terri

    “Don’t try to be your roommate’s best friend! All you need to get along is to respect them and make sure they respect your opinions and needs and be willing to stand up for yourself.”
    David

    “If you have a problem with your roommate, address it immediately or it will grow into a bigger situation than is needed.”
    Elizabeth

    “Make sure you and your roommate talk early on about what you both expect— i.e. regarding phone time, messages, borrowing stuff, guests, cleaning, etc.”
    Tina

    “Don’t blast your music. You’ll be glad you were polite when the girl in the room next door starts blasting her favorite techno remix at 10:30 the night before you have a test and you can ask her to turn down her tunes without being “hypocrite of the week” in your hall.”
    Terri

    Health and Well-Being

    “Eat!!! This isn’t really important to a lot of people, but so many of my friends have went off to school and became so absorbed in partying and/or saving money that they didn’t get the nourishment and quality of food they got at home. Don’t get out of shape … try to eat just like you did at home.”
    Andy

    “Exercise! The college workload can hit you like a ton of bricks, pushing your stress level through the roof. Take some time each day to exercise; it will help you relieve the stress and fight the infamous ‘freshman 15.’”
    Matt

    “Get plenty of sleep. Whether you traveled 1000 miles to a different state, or just to the other side of the city, this is a big change you’re making in your life. Take care of yourself and get enough sleep so you’ll be prepared to deal with all the pressures and stressful situations.”
    Andrea

    “Maintain some private time and space. Sure, you’re sociable, but being around people your own age all day, every day, can be really taxing on the nerves. Find a secluded spot on campus where you can go to relax and spend some time there each week, pondering the meaning of life and what not.”
    Terri

    “Besides the studying and working all the time, make time for yourself. It’s the best way to experience college and also the best way to be happy when you have to write that paper or study. A balanced life is a more healthy one, and leads to better grades in the end.”
    Andy

    Money

    “Budget, budget, budget—don’t just plan to! Keep track of where your money is going—save receipts, balance your checkbook. Don’t let poverty sneak up on you!”
    Andrea

    “Learn not to want what you don’t need. Protect yourself by realizing that you don’t need at least 99 out of 100 things people want to sell you. If you get into a habit of buying things that you don’t need (i.e., things that don’t noticeably help facilitate your health and wellbeing), you’ll send your family to the poorhouse right quick.”
    Seth

    “Get phonecards. They are much cheaper and usually the college phone prices are really high.”
    Tina

    “Shop around for books. The sooner you get into this habit, the better you will feel about the world in general. Check online sources. They offer lots of hard-to-find titles and may sell standard texts at much more reasonable prices than what you will see at the campus bookstore.”
    Andrea

    Social Life

    “Don’t be a stranger. Start spontaneous conversations with people—it’s much easier on a college campus than anywhere else. Always remember that you have nothing to lose.”
    Seth

    “Don’t party too hard. This is one of the main reasons most kids don’t succeed their first few years in school. It’s expected that you’re going to go out and try new things, but don’t overdo it.”
    Andy

    “Don’t forget the contacts and friends you had in high school; they can be there for you more than you will ever know.”
    Kristen

    “Support the efforts of your friends. See their plays. Go to their exhibitions. This’ll encourage them to do the same for you, and before you know it, you’ll build a real, meaningful social and intellectual community.”
    Seth

    “Experience everything you can. There are all kinds of new people at school. This may be your time to break free and find out what you’re all about. Meet new people and hang out with different groups.”
    Andy

     

    Article From: Fastweb

  • College, Tips

    Top 15 Mistakes to Avoid in Choosing a College

    Afraid of choosing the wrong college? Avoid these 15 common blunders students often make in considers their college options.

    Choosing a college is stressful and making sure you make the right decision can often feel like a daunting task. To help out with the process, here are some common mistakes to avoid along the way:

    1. Rushing the process. Finding the right college takes time and effort, not to mention research and an often lengthy application process. Waiting until the last minute or just “falling into a college” is never a good idea. It takes the most important factor out of the equation—you.

    2. Being a follower. Following a boyfriend, girlfriend, best friend to the college of their choice may seem like a good idea at the time because you want to be near them, but this is one of the most pivotal points in your life, too. You need to remember to make the best decisions for yourself and, if your relationships are strong, they will outlast time and distance anyway.

    3. The legacy lure. We’re aware the commandment states “Honor thy father and mother.” However, only considering colleges your parents, siblings or other family members went to in order to follow in their footsteps may not be in your best interest. It’s always better to explore your options and find the right fit for your personality.

    4. Rebellion. In contrast, only considering colleges your parents DON’T want you to go isn’t beneficial either. Sometimes, they have some good insight that may help you decide on what may be best for you. Don’t choose—or not choose—a college out of spite. This is sure to lead you down a path of regret. Choose a college based on what you want, not based on what someone else doesn’t.

    5. You’re a die-hard fan. We’ve all got our favorite teams, but let’s remember that just because they have a great sports team does not mean it’s the right educational fit for you. After all, you’re there to learn, not cheer them on. You can be a fan anywhere, but you can’t learn everywhere.

    6. The temptation to party. So, it’s a great party school but is it a great learning environment? While you may be itching to get out on your own and party like a rock star, that’s really not what college is about. Remember, when choosing a college that you want to choose somewhere what you can have a healthy social atmosphere but a setting that’s conducive to the real goal at hand—learning.

    7. How a student body looks. You’ve heard the student body is attractive. So what? Maybe you like this, maybe you’re worried you won’t fit in, either way, you should ignore these stereotypes because they probably are just that. Also, the attractiveness of a student body shouldn’t really make a different in your decision on where to get an education.

    8. Assuming the worst. Not applying to certain schools because you assume you won’t be accepted underrates your potential and potentially limits your future. Come on, you guys, we have reach schools for a reason. You never know what you can achieve if you don’t try, so at least make an attempt.

    9. Location, location, location. Whether you’re a homebody who wants to stay close or an escape artist who wants to get as far from home as possible, the location should be a factor in choosing a college, not the sole decision maker.

    10. Cost obsessions or carelessness. Forgetting to consider the cost or only considering the cost as a factor are two major issues to avoid. While cost is a huge hurdle, there are many other factors to consider as well and students should not be blinded by this one aspect. Reversely, students who are applying for financial aid or whose parents are paying for college should not neglect to think about cost completely, as costs can add up quite quickly.

    11. Not visiting. Experiences are relative and one person’s dream college could be another’s nightmare. This is why going by what you’ve been told is never a good idea. A person very different from you could have had a positive or negative experience that you likely would not have had. Also, only looking at the website or relying on a college’s advertising is a mistake because they tend to idealize college life and students get unrealistic expectations of what campus is like. It’s always better to visit and experience the college—or one very similar to it—for yourself.

    12. Relying on reputation. Just because it’s a “highly-ranked”, “prestigious” or a “designer” school doesn’t mean it’s the right school for you. Don’t always assume that the difficulty of getting into the school equates to the quality of education you’ll receive. Some students need smaller classes and more one-on-one interaction to thrive in a learning environment.

    13. Pushy parents. Letting your parents decide which college is right for you, or being forced by your parents to attend a certain school is not healthy. You need to think about what you want out of a college. After all, you’re the one attending the school.

    14. Having a one-track mind. Maybe you’ve wanted to go there since you were little and you’ve already decided there is only one right school for you. But not investigating all your options is a huge mistake. You can still attend you’re number one, we’re just asking you to check out the others, too. Just because you think it’s what you want doesn’t mean you can’t ask questions and, believe us, you can never ask too many!

    15. The college specializes in your current major. That’s right, we said current. Choosing a college solely because of a specific major or career path is a major (pun intended) issue because, odds are, your major will change several times. There’s nothing wrong with that, we just want you to be prepared with a school ready to accommodate all your dreams, whatever they may be.

    Article From: Fastweb

  • College, Tips

    12 Tips for Getting into the College of Your Choice

    College admission officers carefully assess your high school grades, courses, test scores, essays, activities, recommendations, and interviews, if required. You will increase your chances of getting into the colleges of your choice by following these twelve tips:

    1. Get the best possible grades you can during ALL four years of high school. Grades are extremely important.

    2. Take academically rigorous classes ALL four years. You should carry as many challenging courses as you can handle—college prep, Advanced Placement (AP), honors, and International Baccalaureate (IB).

    3. Practice taking the SAT or ACT. Become familiar with the types of material covered and the test directions. Take the PSAT during your sophomore year. Determine what knowledge and skills you lack and master them for the actual tests. Take advantage of free online SAT or ACT materials, study guides, practice tests, tutors, and prep courses before or during your junior year.

    4. Try taking both the SAT and ACT. Colleges will accept either test. You may do better on one test than the other. This will boost your chances for admission. Take the SAT or ACT more than once if you are not satisfied with your scores.

    5. Take SAT Subject Tests and AP Tests. Competitive colleges may require you to take some of these exams and they take note of exam results. Only AP scores of five (5) are accepted by top colleges.

    6. Spend sufficient time developing your college essays. Think and reflect before you write. Write, edit, rewrite. This is your opportunity to sell yourself. Convey who you are in your writing: energetic, exciting, passionate, and intellectually curious. How can you make the real “you” stand out from the rest of the crowd? Get feedback on the essays from your teachers and/or other school personnel.

    7. Become involved in your school and/or community during ALL four years and summer vacations. You need to keep track of your involvement in extracurricular and co-curricular activities, sports, and/or volunteer activities in your community. Move up to leadership positions. Demonstrate growth. Develop a deep interest or talent in one or more areas.

    8. Ask your school counselor and teachers who know you well for recommendations. At least a month in advance of college deadlines for recommendations, jog their memories by providing them with a “personal data” or “brag sheet” highlighting your academic accomplishments, athletics, activities, and community service and leadership positions. Also, highlight anything special you did during the summer (for example, foreign travel to improve language skills, volunteer work, projects).

    9. Prepare for on-campus interviews, if required by colleges. Re-read your essays and any information you have acquired on specific colleges. Be friendly and articulate. Dress professionally, not casually. After the interviews, send thank you notes or e-mails expressing your continued interest in their institution.

    10. Decrease your stress by starting your search for colleges early—no later than the start of your junior year. This gives you adequate for researching colleges, completing applications, writing essays, and taking necessary exams.

    11. Get organized and stay focused. Make a file folder for each college that interests you and put relevant information inside of it (for example, a copy of your application and essay, any materials downloaded from the Internet). Keep focused on your ultimate goal: Getting into the college of your choice. Use these checklists to plan the tasks you should take to get into the college of your choice:

    Grade 9 College Planning Checklist [PDF]
    Grade 10 College Planning Checklist [PDF]
    Grade 11 College Planning Checklist [PDF]
    Grade 12 College Planning Checklist [PDF]

    12. Get on-going assistance from your school counselor and teachers. Don’t be afraid to ask them questions no matter how simple your questions may seem.

    Article From: California Career Center

  • School, Stress, Tips

    What Is Stressing You Out About School?

    A new school year is exciting. There’s that wonderful feeling of making a fresh start, catching up with old friends, and making progress by moving up a grade. But there’s no denying that it can be stressful too.

    What’s Worrying You

    If you find yourself preparing for school by hoping for the best and imagining the worst, you’re not alone. Here’s what we heard from 600 people who took our survey on back-to-school worries.

    32% Schoolwork Issues
    30% Social Issues
    25% Appearance Issues
    10% Nothing
    3% Extracurricular Issues

    One third said they worry most about schoolwork. No surprise there. You’ll be studying more advanced material, so it’s natural to worry about whether you’ll do OK.

    But not everyone said schoolwork was their biggest worry. Just as many people said they worry most about social issues like fitting in, having friends, being judged, or being teased. Since social life is such a big part of school, it’s not a shock that social issues are the biggest worry for some people.

    Besides schoolwork and social stuff, another category ranked high on the worry list: appearance. One-fourth of the people who responded to our survey said appearance issues worried them most of all. If this is you, you’ve got plenty of company.

    Kimberly, 14, told us, “I’m happy about going back to school — I’m bored stiff here! But I’m worried about reputation, teasing, failing, and being a nerd.”

    So we asked people to tell us how they plan to cope with the things that worry them most, and whether they have advice for others. Here is what they said.

    Managing Worries About Schoolwork

    Rachel, 15, told us, “I’m kinda hard on myself, like I feel really bad if I don’t have a 4.0 grade average.”

    Lots of people are hard on themselves, but worrying can just add to the pressure. Casey, 15, offered this advice: “Stressing too much about it doesn’t get you anywhere. It’s good to be concerned about your work, but you have to act on that.”

    Here are some of the plans you have for coping with schoolwork:

    Zach, 18, said, “Better time management. I need to stop talking with the social butterflies and get to work!”

    Michael, 16, plans to “come home, take a quick break, and then get started on my work straight away. Procrastination only brings frustration!”

    Katie, 17, offered this advice: “To avoid trouble, do homework as soon as possible and at least start projects the day you get them.”

    Finding the Right Balance — and Support

    Fallon, 16, said, “Finding time for everything is going to be a challenge!”

    Daniel, 14, agreed. “I play sports so I have to keep my grades up to play.” How does he keep the balance? “Work really hard and lean on my parents for lots of support. If you have parents around that actually take an interest in you, take advantage of that and let them be there for you.”

    Relying on other people for support and advice can help balance all the pressures school can bring.

    Claire, 15, depends on her brother. “He is 18 and has been through it.”

    Dana, 14, advised, “Use the guidance counselor. That’s why they are there.”

    Chelsea, 16, said her teachers were a big help when she was trying to catch up in school: “Since I asked for help I’ve felt more relaxed and more normal so that now it doesn’t bother me as much as it did.”

    Balancing school with life’s other demands means staying healthy. Lots of people told us their goal for the school year is to eat well, get plenty of exercise, and lots of sleep so they’ll be primed to succeed.

    Managing Social Pressures and Problems

    When it comes to the social scene, making new friends is one of the biggest worries people mentioned. Lots of people said that friends would be in different classes or even at different schools.

    Jessie, 15, said, “I’m going to try to make new friends and talk more. Don’t worry about being awkward because others are too. Lots of people are good at being cool, but they are insecure too.”

    Finding a safe, welcoming group is a great foundation for dealing with the ups and downs of school. Jessie’s advice: “It’s important to have your own little or big group that you can hang out with.”

    Lolo, 14, explained how “My best friend left last year, and I’m worried about who I’ll hang out with.” Her strategy is: “Don’t hang out with anyone who has a good social image but who is mean. Try to find someone who will really be your friend.”

    Lots of people are concerned about drifting apart from friends and breaking away from existing friendships to start new ones.

    Jen, 16, told us, “I have not talked to my best friends all summer. I don’t want to be their friend anymore, but they don’t get that.”

    Leanna, 14, said, “I am stressed about the groups and who I am going to sit with because I have different friends in different groups.”

    Tim, 14, worried about “making new friends without ex-friends spreading rumors.”

    Brittany, 15, who worried about dealing with “rude old friends” offered this advice: “Be nice to everyone. You never know who you may need help from in the future.”

    And Amina, 14, said, “There are these really jealous girls and they are always stressing me out.” She found that just being nice to them can make a lot of difference: “They will be amazed at how you treat them and maybe loosen up some.”

    Using kindness to stop meanness in its tracks is one good way to deal. Jessica, 16, has another strategy for coping with rude people: “I just ignore them. It drives them crazy when you don’t act or seem like you care about anything they have to say.”

    Some of you worry that the things you did in the past will influence how people see you now. Tina, 15, told us, “My best friend and I were in a car accident last year when we decided to go to a party instead of school. So I am worried that my peers and teachers will think that I am irresponsible because of that incident.”

    Amanda, 14, said her way of dealing with rumors and gossip is “to hold my head up high, smile, and try to create a new reputation for myself. Change the negatives into positives!”

    Looking Good

    How we feel about the way we look is closely tied to social issues, feeling comfortable, and being accepted.

    Codi, 14, said, “I am not usually a shy person, but starting high school in a new school is scary. I don’t know anyone other than those on my soccer team. I am afraid that once they see me out of my soccer clothes and in my skater cut-up clothes they won’t want to talk to me.”

    “At my old school, I was the most popular girl,” said Emily, 14. “Now I’m starting to get acne and developing.” Dealing with body changes is a big issue for lots of people.

    It’s natural to worry about appearance, but most people said they try to keep things in perspective.

    Casey, 14, said, “A year from now, will what you worried about really be a big deal? Other stuff is going to happen.”

    Lots of you recommend getting the support of a friend, parent, or counselor when you’re feeling down about your appearance.

    Keisha, 15, said, “Don’t worry about it so much. And when your family and friends say you look great, accept the compliment, because it’s true!”

    Mickie, 14, told us she has no worries about starting school, but she does have this advice for looking good on the first day: “Wear clothes that fit your style. Don’t wear something that makes you look like a poser.”

    And Lia, 14, reminds us, “If you’re worried about your clothes and how you look, just remember that it’s what’s on the inside that matters.”

    We couldn’t agree more.

    From: Teen Health

  • Articles, Fun, Portfolio, Tips, Travel

    10 Activities to Do This Summer with Your Family

    Ideas for Summertime Adventures with Family

    Summer is the time for unwinding and relaxing. We all love summer because it means no school and no responsibilities for a few months. However, sometimes we may wonder what we can do with all of this time that we now have on our hands. One of the best things you can do this summer is to spend time not only with your friends but also with your family. Here are some activities you can suggest to your family that you can do together this summer. You will have fun and bond with those you love.

    1. Go hiking – This is a fun way to get out of the house and explore nature. You can unplug for a little while and see beautiful sights that you wouldn’t see every day.
    2. Go kayaking – Kayaking is another excellent way to get out into nature. It can be relaxing at times and other times it can be scary and exciting.
    3. Visit your favorite amusement park – Everyone loves amusement parks. It is one of the best places to go as a family.
    4. Go fishing – Warm summer days are the best and most enjoyable times to go fishing with the family.
    5. Visit a museum – Museums aren’t everyone’s cup of tea, but, if they are, then going to a museum is the perfect family-friendly activity for the summer. It can be especially fun if you have younger siblings to take with you.
    6. Go on a short road trip – Summertime is the time to get out of the house and explore. Whether it is as far as your backyard or to the beach 6 hours away, getting out and going to places you haven’t been before will create lasting memories.
    7. Go camping – If camping is something you like doing, then summer is the time to do it and enjoy the beauty of nature while doing something you wouldn’t usually do.
    8. Watch a movie at a drive-in movie theater – Whether you are going with family or friends, everyone loves drive-in theaters during the summer. It isn’t expensive and is fun for everyone.
    9. Go swimming – This is the most obvious one, but you can go swimming in more than just a pool. You can go to a river, a lake, or even a waterfall. Everyone loves swimming because it is the perfect way to cool off on a hot summer day.
    10. Make s’mores by an outdoor fire – Whatever you decide to do with your summer day, the best way to end it is by a fireside with hot s’mores and friends and family by your side.