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Birth Control

  • Birth Control, Health, Photography, Puberty

    5 Tips All Girls should Know: Periods

    1. Periods. We all have them, and for most of us, we hate them. Periods are hard to track and terribly painful. If your looking for understanding in your period or even just trying to track your period you can use The Flow App. The Flow App is perfect for tracking your period and understanding your body, also gives really cool facts about your body.
    2. Usually, if you have some type of health insurance birth control is free. You can ask your doctor or often at public health clinics. Birth control is not just for sex and does not make you a bad person if you use it. Birth control can also help regulate your period and stop intense stomach cramps.
    3. If you are able to track your period and you have bad cramps try taking medicine a day before your period starts. This way your body will already be prepared to fight the pain. Medicines that usually do the trick is Midol or ibuprofen(DISCLAIMER: I’m not a doctor these may or may not work for you.)
    4. Its okay not to use a tampon, or even be able to put one in. Pads are just as great! Don’t feel ashamed because many women still use pads in their thirties. What you use is truly up to you and what you’re comfortable with.
    5. Although, it is true to avoid certain foods on your period and you should live a healthy lifestyle you should also give your body a break. Being on your period is stressful and your body is doing amazing things. You’ve earned a donut or cookie. Don’t be ashamed to eat some sweets on your period!

     

  • Birth Control

    Abstinence

    Choosing not to have sex (until you’re married, until you’re ready…whatever) and it’s the only 100% effective method of birth control.

     

    WHAT IT IS

    This one is pretty simple—abstinence is exactly what it sounds like: waiting to have sex. That may mean until you’re married or until you’ve found the right person or because you did it before but don’t want to now. No matter what you’re reasons, abstinence is choosing not to have intercourse.

    HOW IT WORKS

    • Step one: don’t have sex.
    • Step two: that’s it!

     

    EFFECTIVENESS

    Waiting is 100% effective (and for the record, this is the only method of birth control that is 100% effective).

    Note: When we talk about effectiveness we mean typical use number or what happens when couples used this method of birth control pretty well; it accounts for humans errors and occasional contraceptive failure. BUT, teenagers are often not as careful as older people in using rates for teens may be a little worse than what you see here. Keep that in mind as you’re looking at the options and remember that for birth control to be effective, you have to use it consistently and correctly every single time.

    MAJOR PERKS

    • Super effective.
    • Easy to remember.
    • Always available.
    • Long-term coverage.
    • No visit to a medical provider required.
    • Non-hormonal.

    MINOR DRAWBACKS

    • You have to be perfect every single time and it can be hard to say no!
    • If you change your mind and decide to become sexually active, you have to plan ahead and have some kind of birth control on hand.

     

    NEED TO SEE A MEDICAL PROVIDER?

    Nope; this one is all on you (and your partner).

    From: stayteen.org

  • Birth Control

    The Pill

    What is it?

    The birth control pill is what most people think of as “the pill”. The pill is the most common BC method and is highly effective if taken every day. There are many strengths and brands of contraceptive pills. You can talk with your clinician about which type of BC pills is right for you.

    Pros:

    • 92-99% effective.
    • Can make periods more regular and cramps less painful.
    • Can improve acne and PMS.
    • Helps protect against uterine and ovarian cancer.

     

    Cons:

    • Does not protect against sexually transmitted diseases or HIV.
    • May cause irregular bleeding. These side effects often disappear over time, or can be helped by changing to a different pill with a different amount of hormones.

     

    Who uses birth control pills?

    People who have the self discipline to take a pill every single day and who have a safe place to store their pills.

    How do you use birth control pills?

    For most types of BC pills you swallow one pill every day for three weeks. The last week you either take a pill that has no hormones –a “reminder” pill to keep you in the habit of taking a pill each day-or take no pills for one week. This is when you will get your period. There are also pills you can take to not get your period at all. Talk to your provider about what kind of pills are best for you.

    Where do you get birth control pills?

    You can get a prescription for BC pills at a clinic near you.

    How effective are birth control pills?

    BC pills are 92-99% effective. They are most effective when taken every day. If you skip a pill during a pill cycle, you may be at higher risk for unintended pregnancy.

    Does the pill offer STD protection?

    NO. For STD protection use condoms with this method.

    From: TeenSource

  • Birth Control

    Condoms

    What is it?

    The male condom is a thin covering that fits over an erect penis. Condoms are used to help prevent pregnancy and protect from HIV and other STDs when you have vaginal, anal or oral sex. Condoms can be made out of different materials.

    Condoms come in different textures, colors and sizes. Make sure the condom fits. Some condoms are lubricated, making the condom more slippery and comfortable to use during sex. Only water based lubricants can be used with latex condoms.

    Pros:

    • Condoms can prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV.
    • You don’t have to go to a clinic to get them.
    • Condoms are easy to find in many places; at supermarkets, gas stations, drugstores, local clinics, and in vending machines.
    • Condoms are easy to carry around.
    • Condoms may help an erection last longer.

     

    Cons:

    • Condoms can break and slip off 1-2% of the time. To prevent breakage and slippage check for proper placement and size.

     

    Who uses male condoms?

    People who are looking for no-commitment BC and want STD protection as much as they want pregnancy prevention.

    How do you use male condoms?

    Before using a condom, make sure which way it unrolls. Pull back the foreskin and unroll the condom all the way to the base of the penis.

    Talk to your partner about using a condom in advance. Change the condom if the penis is exposed to a different site (i.e. moves from anus to vagina). Remove the condom immediately after you ejaculate (cum). Withdraw the penis while holding the rim of the condom at the base of the penis to avoid having any cum spill out. The condom should be used just once and then thrown away.

    What about lube?

    Lubricant is a water-based, slippery liquid that can help prevent condoms from breaking during use and may prevent irritation caused by the skin-on-skin friction that can happen during sex.

    Important things to remember about lubricant:

    • Only use WATER-based lubricants that are made for the purpose of having sex.
    • Never use anything oil-based on a condom (such as Vaseline, baby oil, body lotion or vegetable oils) because the oil weakens the latex that the condom is made of and can cause condoms to break!

     

    What about “double bagging”?

    You may have heard of “double bagging,” or layering two male condoms at once to get extra protection. We don’t have any data showing that “double bagging” is better or worse than the single use of condoms, but we do have a lot of evidence showing that the single use of condoms is effective at preventing STDs and pregnancy. Even if “double bagging” offers protection, because we hear so often that condoms reduce sensation, it’s probably worthwhile to focus on the correct use of a single condom. This will provide the most scientifically effective birth control method + STD protection while retaining sensation!

    Where do you get male condoms?

    You can buy condoms at most drugstores and supermarkets, and many clinics give them away free of charge. You do not need a prescription to buy condoms, and you do not need ID. People of all ages can easily buy condoms

    How effective are male condoms?

    Condoms are 85-98% effective. The biggest reason for condom failure is not using a condom correctly each time you have sex.

    Do male condoms offer STD protection?

    Yes. Condoms are the only BC method that also prevent STDs and HIV. They can also be used with other Birth Control methods for double protection.

    From: TeenSource

  • Birth Control, Sexual Health, Tough Questions

    Types of Birth Control and Their Pros and Cons

    Which Birth Control Method is Best for You?

    Birth control can sometimes be a taboo subject and can be especially uncomfortable for teens to talk about. It is important to remember that birth control is used for numerous reasons such as helping with regulating periods, treating symptoms of endometriosis, and preventing unwanted pregnancies, which is the primary purpose. It is essential to know your options when getting birth control. Most people think the pill is their only option, but there are several different forms of birth control. Some factors one might consider when deciding which type of birth control to use include its effectiveness for preventing pregnancy, the frequency with which you renew it, and how well or poorly your body reacts to it. Here are the four main types of birth control on the market which one should consider when thinking about getting on birth control.

    1. The Pill

    The pill is the first on the list because it is the most obvious. The pill is good because you can take it just a day at a time, and if you want to quit then you just stop taking it. The downside to taking the pill is that you DO have to worry about it every single day, and if you forget to take it then it can throw you off. While birth control is used for more than just protecting against pregnancy, if you do use it while being sexually active and you miss just one day, it can result in pregnancy. Even if you don’t forget, the pill only works 91% of the time when protecting against unwanted pregnancy, which most people don’t realize. Many people end up taking the pill because they don’t know there are other options available to them.

    2. Depo-Provera aka “The Shot”

    Depo-Provera is birth control in the form of a shot given by your gynecologist every three months. The main pro is not having to worry about it as often as the pill, but you still have to remember to get your shots on time for it to be effective for whatever reason you may be getting it. When using it to protect against pregnancy, it protects about 97% of the time and can protect up to 99% of the time if you get your shots regularly and on time. The shot is a good middle ground because it is more effective than the pill but is somewhat less effective than the implants. It also requires less frequent attention than the pill, but more attention than the implants which can last for years.

    3. The IUD

    The IUD and arm implant are similar. The IUD is placed in the uterus and works by releasing hormones directly into the uterus which keep the sperm from reaching the egg. Most people who have an IUD can also expect to experience no menstruation at all, so it is also great for those who have heavy periods. This option prevents pregnancy more than 99% of the time and can last anywhere from 3-5 years depending on what kind you get. Some people, like myself, tend to avoid this option because they don’t like the idea of having something placed into their uterus. The uterus is a sensitive area, and having something foreign placed there can cause complications every so often. Even though this is not common, there is still the possibility, and it does happen on occasion.

    4. Implanon/Nexplanon aka “The Arm Implant”

    The implant is the birth control which I personally use because, to me, it seemed like the easiest option. However, the majority of women do not know about this option. I did not know about it until I started researching the types of birth control which exist on the market. I did not want to worry about taking a pill every single day and, even though I was using it to regulate my period, 91% effectiveness in pregnancy prevention did not sit well with me, had I needed to use it for that reason. The implant is basically a small white stick about 1.5 inches long and 2mm in diameter. It is inserted into your upper left arm by your gynecologist, and that’s it; you are good for three years. You don’t have to think about it for a while, and it protects against unwanted pregnancy more than 99% of the time. The con to this option is that people are prone to bleed over a period of time after they receive the implant. For me, I had a period for two weeks, but after it finally ended, I didn’t have a period in the two years between then and now. Others aren’t always so lucky. Some women have bled for up to six months and just decided it wasn’t worth it. Basically, some people don’t react well to it. Talk to your gynecologist about the best options for you and the concerns you may have if you are thinking about getting the implant. Every woman is different, and our bodies react differently to different medicines.