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Girl Spring

  • Articles, GirlSpring.com

    SHE Camp Summer Camp 7/29-8/2 (RSVP by 7/26)

    Camp for Girls

    Girl empowerment through improv!

    SHE Camp July 29-August 2 at Homewood Library for girls ages 9-12 and 13-16.

    Was $275, NOW $150 with code SAVE50

    Led by Second City actress/comedian, Jessica Antes. SHE Camp participants will develop the skills they need to develop their own unique voices and encourage a positive self-image and the formation of healthy relationships. Through improv, dance, crafts, storytelling, and plenty of laughs, participants will gain the tools they need for full self-expression.  

    Schedule

    Day 1: Team building and improv

    Day 2: Standup, Sketch, Storytelling

    Day 3: Movement and Positive Body Image

    Day 4: Dream Boards, Setting Intentions and Goals, Review

    Day 5: Show prep and show

    Learn more and RSVP by July 26 here, https://secure.qgiv.com/for/gir/event/802782/

  • GirlSpring.com, Music, TRENDING

    Rising Star Cloe Wilder Charms with “I Don’t Wanna”

    cloe wilder

    We are excited to present Cloe Wilder’s newest single, “I Don’t Wanna”

    ABOUT CLOE WILDER: 
    Dark/Pop’s newest powerhouse, Cloe Wilder, is a force to be reckoned with. Armed with incredibly powerful songwriting skills, in addition to a voice beyond her years, 13-year-old songstress Cloe crafts melancholic, yet fiercely relatable songs that touch the deepest parts of the human psyche. Championing the concept of accepting one’s mental health issues and embracing imperfection, she is set to become a revolution in her time, starting with her flawless debut, “Overthinking”, and carrying the torch with her upcoming single, “I Don’t Wanna”.
     
     

     

  • Articles, College

    Want a Career in Broadcasting?

    Broadcasting

    Strategies for Planning an Amazing Career in Broadcasting

    Did you know that an estimated 243 million American adults tune in to their favorite radio stations on a monthly basis? Or that 47 percent of people prefer watching the news as opposed to reading it (as reported by USA Today)? Despite what some may say, there are still plenty of opportunities to have a great career in broadcasting. Although the needs of the industry may be changing as technology evolves, there will always be a need for on-air and behind the scenes talent. As you begin to plan your education and career, there are plenty of steps you can take to set yourself up for a successful future. Take a closer look at three strategies that will help you prepare for a career in broadcasting. 

    Get the experience you’ll need now

    To be considered for a broadcasting role, hiring professionals are not simply looking for candidates with a relevant education. On top of taking college classes, senior members of radio stations, television stations, and online media groups want people who’ve already gained experience. From student radio stations, to college television channels, to media internships, you have tons of opportunities to work in the industry before earning your college degree. When you consistently work in these kinds of roles, you can pick up valuable skills, such as learning how to use radio equipment. Having tangible skills not only makes it more likely that you’ll one day score an amazing job, but it will also give you the confidence of knowing how to perform your future duties.

    Shadow broadcasting professionals in your area

    In addition to taking on roles with student television or radio broadcasting, and working in internship roles, ask local broadcasters if you can shadow them for a day. You can start doing this by visiting the websites of local TV and/or radio stations, and then finding the email addresses of professionals in the same role(s) you are considering. From there, send them an email introducing yourself, your career goals, and request to shadow them for either a few hours or an entire day. This experience is perfect if you’ve not yet gotten an up-close look at the industry. Before contacting local broadcasting professionals, be sure to check with a parent to make sure that this idea has their approval.

    Explore colleges with broadcast journalism majors

    If you are starting to think about where to attend college, now is the time to find out which options are best for broadcast journalism majors. As of 2019, College Magazine ranks Northwestern University, Emerson College, the University of Georgia, and State University of New York at Oswego as some of the top choices. The advantages of selecting a college that is known for broadcasting include having better access to internships, state-of-the-art broadcasting technology, and exceptional professors with specific industry knowledge.

    Instead of waiting to get the education and experience needed to succeed in radio, television, or online broadcasting, do as much as you can now. Even though your opportunities will be somewhat limited until college, the earlier you can get your foot in the door of the industry, the better.

  • GirlSpring.com, Interview, Shero, Sheroes, work

    Shero Debra Des Vignes, Indiana Prison Writers Workshop

    Debra Vignes photo

    We are always on the lookout for Sheroes and stumbled across Debra Des Vignes and this very cool program and wanted to share!

    1) Can you explain in layman’s terms what exactly is the Indiana Prison Writers Workshop?
    Indiana Prison Writers Workshop is a not-for-profit whose mission is to improve the lives of those incarcerated through creative writing and expression. Through a 12-week curriculum volunteer instructors provide 15-minute writing prompts to prisoners on a range of topics and themes and share prose by literary greats like Langston Hughes, Mark Twain, and Maya Angelou. Each workshop includes discussion of the elements of writing and offenders read their work aloud and hear constructive criticism on their work. In between weekly classes, offenders spend time on bigger writing assignments. The goal is for them to use their critical-thinking skills and gain greater empathy by understanding differences through stories and experiences.


    2) How did you get into this line of work?
    I became interested in working with this underserved population after volunteering at a correctional facility. It was there that I could see the true power of words. I believed it could be transformative and healing for the men. And so, I began the creative writing workshop in October 2017, and was able to spend one-year working with the same group of offenders each week. It became a safe space. Since then, the program has spread into three Indiana correctional facilities – in partnership with Indiana Department of Correction – and my support team includes three talented and dedicated writing volunteers – who also bring in monthly guests such as poets, rappers, and community leaders. And while I no longer lead group workshops, I support the volunteers under the program who do and help share the written work produced in their classrooms.


    3) What has been the most positive outcome of this experience for the participants?
    To learn that people do believe in them and to see their achievements come out in the stories they write. We had one offender write a novel in prison and gave credit to the workshop for accomplishing this. I enjoy engaging with program followers who view the prisoners as talented and creative beings.

    4) What has been the most rewarding part of it for you?
    To see the glimmer of hope in a man’s eyes after he’s written or expressed something challenging or difficult to write about. To know these men can re-write their own life’s script. To watch a man leave the program better equipped to face the world.


    5) What is your advice to girls who may have parents that are incarcerated – in terms of forgiveness?

    Stay strong, but also find forgiveness and understanding in your heart. We all make mistakes; some are greater than others. Write about your pain or talk to someone.

    Debra Vignes Photo

    6) Do you feel like you are personally ever at risk working with inmates?
    No, they treat me with respect. It means a lot to them to be accepted.


    7) What is your advice to girls who want to pursue non-traditional fields?
    Follow the path you are most interested in and know that it’s OK to change the direction of your life at any time. Complacency is foreign to me. There’s risk in pursuing something new. Oftentimes, the things we’re most passionate about take us out of our comfort zone. It did for me. There was a lot of discomfort and growing pains until it evened out and I started to believe in my own work and see the value in it. Go all in! An offender once told me, “Go big or go home.” He was referring to a decision to get a tattoo – but you see my point. When I “went big” and started building the prison creative writing program – that’s when things really started to change for me. At first, I tried to run the program while holding down a full-time job. I’m also a wife, mother, and a boxer. I realized I couldn’t do it all. This must be a challenge all creatives face at some point as they enter a new space. It takes a good deal of inner-strength, grit, and perseverance. One may get disapproving eyes and/or feel the weight of making enough money. But know, we need more creatives in the world. We desperately need these game-changers.

    A woman with drive is a strong woman.
    A woman who remains playful and focused is a strong woman.

    Nigerian Poet Ben Okri in his book, “A Way of Being Free” wrote: “The artist should never lose the spirit of play. It is curious how sometimes the biggest tasks are best approached tangentially, with a smile in the soul.”

    8) Did you ever see yourself doing this when you were in high school?
    No. In high school I had no direction. I had no clear path, vision, or goal of what my future would look like. I was sort of a rebel. I was fortunate that in college (California State University Northridge) I was selected as an apprentice at ABC-7 News, a television news station in Los Angeles. It was there that my love for journalism began. I went on to work as a Television news reporter for a decade covering the crime and courts beat at different stations around the country. In a way, I was destined to do this work; to help offenders prepare for re-entry through writing – having covered crime for so long. You can’t break the cycle unless you head into the ring.

    — Find Indiana Prison Writers Workshop on Facebook to learn of activities, happenings, and events and also read stories written by offenders.


    — Read their stories in a book I just published, Sunday Sweet Sunday, available on Amazon.


    — Find us at inprisonwritersworkshop.org

  • Articles, GirlSpring.com

    I Hate U I Love U

    We are obsessed with Cloe Wilder – check out her newest video here:

    Cloe Wilder – i hate u, i love u [gnash ft. Olivia O’Brien] (Official Video)

    About

    Dark/Pop’s newest powerhouse, Cloe Wilder, is a force to be reckoned with. Armed with incredibly powerful songwriting skills, in addition to a voice beyond her years, 13-year-old songstress Cloe crafts melancholic, yet fiercely relatable songs that touch the deepest parts of the human psyche. Championing the concept of accepting one’s mental health issues and embracing imperfection, she is light years beyond the typical young musician, set to become a revolution in her time, starting with her flawless debut single, “Overthinking”. In discussing her debut single, Cloe states: “I’m glad that this is my first single, because it’s a pretty accurate representation of me”.

    www.cloewilder.com

    www.instagram.com/cloewilder

    www.facebook.com/cloewilder

    www.twitter.com/cloewilder

  • Shero

    Faces of Feminism

    We had the honor of interviewing these two amazing young ladies, Olivia Bokesch and Callan Burton-Shore, the co-founders of Faces of Feminism after discovering them on Instagram. Their website, https://facesofeminism.org features tons of interviews with people who are asked to speak about what feminism means to them.

    Can you tell us why you wanted to start this project?

    We wanted to start this project because we experienced daily dismissal of feminist issues by people who think the cause does not pertain to them. The group that we saw this in the most was men because they often think they can’t be feminists since the traditional definition of feminism is about equal rights for womxn. We want men and others to understand that just because they have the privilege to ignore the feminist cause, does not mean they cannot still support a progressive movement for womxn’s rights. Another group that often distances themselves from feminism is the queer community, especially non-binary people, femmes, and trans women. This is because these people have historically been excluded and in some cases oppressed by feminists. We want Faces of Feminism to not only teach less educated activists about intersectional feminism and privilege, but make a space where people of all genders, sexual orientations, cultures, ethnicities, races, and levels of ability can be included in the fight for justice, especially those people who have been historically oppressed within the movement. Ultimately, we started this project to change the face of feminism. 

    Can you tell us in your own words what you think feminism is and isn’t?

    Callan: Feminism is intersectional; feminism is not exclusive. Feminism is ever changing; feminism is not stagnant. Feminism should make you think; feminism is not always comfortable.

    Olivia: Feminism is a progressive movement of open-minded, but not always like-minded people. Feminism changes over time to become more intersectional and include new definitions of what being a woman/femme/non-binary person means and to include their lifestyles.  Feminism is not made for only one gender to take part in and is not made to make anyone in the human race better than another. At its core, feminism is the equality of genders, and at its peak, feminism is the equality of all humankind.

    Can men be feminists?

    Callan: Men can absolutely be feminists. We try to get as many men involved with FOF as we possibly can! It’s a total misconception that men can’t be feminists, and it’s similar to the misconception that white people can’t fight racism. However, just like it must be when white people act against racism, when men are feminists they must take a step back and let womxn speak/act first. In every instance of inequity, there is the oppressor and the oppressed, so to be a good ally/ feminist when you are the oppressor, you must realize that the oppressed group has been fighting this war far longer than you have, and you must let them take center stage.

    Olivia: Men can be feminists because anyone can be a feminist! One of the central goals of FOF, is to teach others that you don’t have to be a cisgender woman to fight for equal rights in the name of feminism. However, like Callan said, it is important for men to know when to take a step back and listen to womxn and let them take charge of their own rights.

    Who are some feminists you admire both from history and from modern day?

    Callan: I admire activist Mona Chalabi who uses her knowledge as a data analyst to prove that injustice still exists (in spades) in the world. She makes extremely creative and captivating graphics to the present the data. I also admire Marsha P. Johnson. She was a black, transgender activist who fought in the Stonewall riots and started one of the first organizations to support non-binary and transgender youth. Lastly, I admire Stacey Abrams because she has made strides in a state that often turns red in elections. She also always prioritizes womxn’s and marginalized community issues, despite the challenges she faces as a black woman in politics. 

    Olivia: A feminist I admire from history is the writer and black queer activist, Audre Lorde. She helped to kickstart a new wave of intersectional feminism that involves any and every womxn. I highly recommend the book Sister Outsider, a collection of her personal essays and poems. A modern feminist I admire is Rebekah Bruesehoff, a 12-year-old transgender girl. After having the privilege to see her speak, I was moved to become a better and stronger ally for the LGBTQ+ community. Her powerful story and voice is constantly used to further equality for all, something this world could use a bit more of.

    What would success look like in terms of equal rights for all?

    Callan: I think full equality is a long way away, but it is important to celebrate the little successes along the way. Examples of these successes will be when equal pay is established, when queer individuals are given access to all rights and resources they need, when there is representation of ALL marginalized groups in media, when the disabled community is seen and heard, when disproportional gun violence affecting POC communities is eliminated, and when religions, such as Islam, and their places of worship are respected fully. Ultimately though I believe that it is equity, not equality, we should be striving for.

    Olivia: Full equality is a one step forward, two steps back type of deal. Progress is gained and lost daily, especially under the current United States government administration. Although it is more likely than not that the world will never reach it, full equality starts when the privileged acknowledge their historical oppression of minorities, like slavery, as well as acknowledging that many systems this world is built off of systematically oppress and take advantage of marginalized groups. Equal rights for all will take many more decades of unlearning and relearning the world as we know it today.