Browsing Tag:

bullying

  • Photography

    Why You Should Watch “The Heathers”

    “The Heathers” is a movie that has become one of my favorite movies.

    The story follows Veronica, a new member of the popular group in school the Heathers. She is intrigued by a new guy J.D., and her life turns in an oath of suicides and extremes. However, on the surface, the movie seems like another teenage drama, but it has many underlying themes. One of the big themes is suicide. The story is a satire. So, although some of the views portrayed in the movie appear harsh, it is only to emphasize the opposite. For instance, multiple teenagers commit suicide in the movie (not a big spoiler), and the adults in the movie turn the suicides into a political statement on society and glorify the suicides because the ones committing suicide are doing it for political reasons.

    By using satire, the film indicates that suicide is not the best choice and that teens should get help.

    The handling of the suicides emphasizes the struggle teenagers have with not being recognized and not talked down to. Throughout the film, the adults are naive and condescending, always treating the kids like children. Even the teachers use the suicides, a statement by the teens, to make points about their own beliefs, disregarding the messages of the students. Even suicide cannot bring the adults to listen. (Again, this is all satirical, and the movie does not condone suicide or extremist acts).

    With all of the underlying themes and the characters, “The Heathers” is an incredibly clever film that I believe everyone should watch.

    It shows the awfulness of bullying and the relevance of teenagers in the world. However, if all of the intellectual aspects do not interest you, it is an enthralling film with an amazing plot and ending. It is shocking and different from any other movie I have watched. You will not be disappointed.

    Learn more on IMDB, https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0097493/

  • Writing

    Yasmeen’s Not so Modern Life: The Series

    Yasmeens's Not so Modern Life: The Series

    Note From GirlSpring: This is the first part of a fictional series from our one of our contributors. GirlSpring empowers girls to be creative in different outlets, such as fiction writing (as this is). If you want to become a contributor, head over to www.girlspring.com/submit.

     

    Episode 1: “It’s Life”

    Hi, my name is Yasmeen Marie Pepei Lopez, I know I know a very very very long name but that’s what my abeula Roseleen named me. I am a sophomore and I go to James County High School but everyone just calls it J.C.

    “yasmeen! hurry up, you’re gonna be late!” my mom xiomara yelled.

    “coming!” I said as I put on my sneakers and head down the stairs.

    “well look who’s alive.” my papá roberto said as he picked up his bag.

    “I know, i know..” I said picking up some toast as I heard my brother xzaiver’s car horn beep indicating that he’s about to leave.

    “better hurry mija.” my mom said entering the kitchen.

    “I’m going, love you guys.” I said hurrying outside.

    “love you too, be safe!” my mom yelled as I approached the car and hopped in.

    “took you long enough.” xzaiver said pulling off.

    “yeah yeah, whatever.” I said.

    “what if I’m late?” my sister ava said.

    and here it goes, let me just give you a run down on my life.

    I have three siblings, xzaiver who’s 17, ava who’s 12, then joey who’s 7. we all have very different personalities, just like me and my best friends, but in the end we’re one big family.

    speaking of friends, let me introduce you to them.

    first, we have isiah, he’s very outspoken and a wild card you could say. he LOVES makeup, and you rarely see him without it he’ll probably start his own makeup company one day, he also happens to be gay but he’s open about it and we wouldn’t trade him for the world.

    next, we have kacey, she’s the artist of the group you will never ever see her without her pencils and her sketchbook. most people think she’s shy but when you get to know her..let’s just say not so shy..

    then there’s elijah, we just call him eli. he’s the star quaterback, the “hot jock” everyone loves. even through he plays football and seems like that “hottie” that’s too cool for school, he’s actually a huge geek. he loves astrology and star wars and anything that deals with the galaxy but not many people know that but us..

    and onto ivy, ivy is the mom of the group she’s also putting herself before us and also keeping us in shape and at times out of trouble. not at all times though, she loves to dance so she will occasionally drag her to a party or two and then.. a whole new ivy comes out.

    next is nova, nova is the more reserved and quite one, her parents hold certain standards over her that kind of makes her not that social, but when she’s around us she’s herself. she’s actually really funny and loves to collect cameras. she has a huge passion for the photographer world.

    after her, there’s isabella, but we call her izzy. she has a passion for music and playing instruments, you will never not hear her singing or making some type of music.

    last but not least, theodore, yes that his name but he goes by teddy. he loves nature and animals and he’s always dragging us on some type of adventure. he will not just stay in one place, he’s determined to travel the entire world and we most definitely can see that.

    and that’s our group, we’re not all perfect and we don’t always get along but hey, that’s natural.

    “see if one of your friends can take you home, I have baseball practice” xzaiver said as we hopped out.

    ‘thanks for the late heads up” I said sarcastically

    “you’re most definitely are welcome” he smirked walking away to his group of friends.

    “yass yasmeen!’ isiah yelled out walking up to me.

    ” you look fab-ou-lous honey!” he said causing me to laugh.

    “thanks siah, where is everyone else?” I asked as we intertwined arms heading into the school.

    “I think they-” is all he could get out before they all head towards our way.

    “right here.” he laughed.

    “morning chicas” isiah said hugging everyone as I do the same.

    “why are you always so happy in the morning?” kacey asked rolling her eyes.

    ‘because, who wouldnt be this happy when you look like this?” he said doing a vogue and walking down the hall as if it was a fashion show walk way.

    the bell ring sounds for homeroom.

    “and it starts, see you guys at lunch.” I say as we all part our ways.

    nova, teddy and I head to the same class.

    “so there’s this party this weekend at rebecca’s house, we should go” teddy said as we took our seats.

    “not really up for a party…you know how my parents are.” nova said.

    “just say you’re staying at my place to study.” I said.

    “I would but its too close to weekly exams and you know how my dad gets around this time” she said sadly.

    she’s right, you know how people makes jokes about how smart asians are and how their parents are super super strict well those are nova’s parents. they expect her to make all A’s and be the perfect daughter and go to church and be an innocent angel.

    “we’ll come up with something.” teddy said.

    “maybe..” nova replied.

    “okay, what’s really wrong? you seem more off them usual.” teddy said as the teacher told us to quiet down so he could take roll.

    “I’ll tell you later.” she said turning her attention onto the teacher.

    teddy and I gave each other a look, nova’s usually not like this but whatever it is hopefully it’s nothing too bad but in this group you honestly never know.

    but hey, everyone goes through all kinds of stuff especially at our age but that’s life.

  • Bullying

    The Truth About Your Voice on Social Media

    Girlspring social media

    When I first started middle school, we passed notes on little pieces of paper until the paper was nothing more than a grey scale.

    It was our version of texting. It was tedious and involved a system of people willing to pass them back and forth for you. There was always the risk that someone you didn’t want to see or read it would, but it was a risk we were willing to take.

    I remember a girl in my sixth grade English class being made fun of in a series of notes. The class kept passing them back and forth for some hateful little girls without seeing the contents of what they were sharing. This went on for days, with the girls snickering in secret.

    Then my teacher caught wind of the notes passing and halted one of their letters before it reached the second reader of the day. I won’t repeat what was said, but just know that the girl who the note was about left the room in tears. The mean girls looked horrified. They didn’t think what they were saying was that big of a deal.

    They felt that there were no consequences for something that was written down versus spoken aloud. This would have been true if the teacher had never apprehended the letter. Or would it have been?

    Would it still be mean if the person you were writing about never knew you were writing hurtful things about them?

    This brings me to the topic of Social Media. As our technology grows, so do the opportunities for communication. What was once a simple note in the classroom is now a string of characters on someone’s Twitter feed.

    This gives more power to the speaker or texter. The words that are posted online are there for the public eye and will forever have a paper trail. With all chances to be good, there are equal amounts of chances to be bad. It is what balances the world, but it is something that does not have to support us. As a human race, we can choose to find other measures of entertainment and morals rather than basing them on being horrific to others.

    Unfortunately, there is a sort of confidence boost when we don’t have to see the consequences of our actions.

    Those girls from my sixth-grade class eventually apologized to the girl they hurt, and notes were banned from the classroom. But this did not stop people from sneaking more notes around. It did, however, change the mean girls’ opinions on what they put on paper.

    With social media, there is no immediate action. Even if a series of posts are written concerning something hateful, it could take days before an adult does something to handle it. And too often do we hear that we should ignore our bullies and let them get away with it simply because we are “the better person.” A better person would let them know that what they are doing is wrong.

    If they can use their platform to spit fire, then you can use yours to voice positivity.

    If someone is mean to you on social media, try responding to them once with a heartfelt comment on why what they are saying is problematic for you. Then, seek adult advice or council. You are not what those people say about you. You are what you make of yourself.

    It is okay to seek help from friends, family, or professionals when you are feeling uneasy about something. With so many paper receipts for posts today, there will always be evidence of how the other person hurt you. But in the end, it will affect when they try to get hired for a job. Or if someone is doing a character assessment?

    Try to blend the idea of ignoring your bullies and facing them together. Give them a single response at the start, then move on with your life. If they realize that you aren’t going to bite, they may just get bored. But at least you will have publicly announced how terrible they are behaving and have addressed the issue before moving on.

    If what people are saying about you online is getting deep beneath your skin, you are not alone.

    Everyone experiences self-doubt, insecurities, and sometimes depression. It is up to you how to handle it when you face it. I will provide some links below that can help guide you through some tough social media situations. Hopefully, some of them will be relatable and helpful if you’re in this situation:

    https://www.girlspring.com/what-you-can-do/

    https://www.helpguide.org/articles/ abuse/bullying-and-cyberbullying.htm

    https://us.ditchthelabel.org/cyber-bullying-top-9-tips-on-overcoming-it/

    https://www.girlspring.com/cyberbullying/

     

    Some key tips for dealing with social media drama, whether it is being bullied or unfairly treated:

    Remain professional or as adult-like as possible

    Give short answers when your words become too aggressive

    Remind yourself that this is public information and that future employers will likely have access to it

    Think of positive thoughts

  • Portfolio

    Cross-Dressing in One of the World’s Most Conservative Countries

    Cross-Dressing in One of the World’s Most Conservative Countries

    In the deeply conservative, traditional society of Afghanistan, there’s a surprising practice that somehow seems to both contradict our idea of Afghan custom regarding women, and reinforce it beyond our imagination.

    The Underground Girls of Kabul begins with Author Jenny Nordberg’s unexpected discovery of Afghanistan’s fascinating hidden secret- bacha posh, or girls who pose as boys. The book unfolds like a mystery as Nordberg unearths surprising and thought-provoking information along her journey.

    Although little was known in the United States of the existence of this practice at the time of Nordberg’s travels, it was actually quite well-known and accepted- even respected in Afghanistan, where, in a family, having a bacha posh “boy” was better than having no boy at all. There, a woman’s function in life was not complete until she could bear a son, and if it didn’t happen, she was shamed.

    Sons could also do many things a daughter couldn’t- play, run around town freely, wear comfortable clothing, and yell- and work. When families needed income, it was often best for them to have a daughter pose as a boy to earn money during tough times.

    Nordberg covers factors of reasoning for the practice, as well as complicating factors such as puberty, and how individual families handled them. A strength of the book is how Nordberg did not try to impose western ideas onto the Afghani people. She used the terminology they used, and let them speak for themselves. The Underground Girls of Kabul is a book that should be added to everyone’s summer reading list, and will leave the reader with an entirely new concept of gender itself.