Browsing Tag:

money

  • College, GirlSpring.com

    Check Out These Awesome College Scholarships!

    College Scholarships

    Awesome Scholarships for College

    Don’t let student debt deter your dreams.

    College is simultaneously scary and exciting. Since college is the first step towards adulthood, it is also the first step towards responsibility. The decisions made after turning 18 may heavily influence your entire future.

    Although college is accompanied by loads of stress, it is an amazing opportunity. College prepares us for the future and teaches us accountability – a vital skill that high school does not.

    Seems great, right?

    Well, one downfall is the cost. Due to the dollar signs, many of those who are financially unstable believe that college is not an option. 

    However, this is not true.

    Scholarships are a life-saver. In fact, they’re a key component in my college career. Listed below are a few scholarships that will help you headstart paying for college.

    Specific Field Scholarships

    Southern Automotive Women’s Forum

    This scholarship is catered towards women pursuing a STEM-related field. Applicants must be a female high school senior or graduate who is enrolled or plans to enroll in a Southeastern college. States include Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. The minimum GPA for this scholarship is 2.5.

    Amount: $500 to $5,000

    Deadline: June 1, 2019

    Additional information and application: www.southernautomotivewomen.org/scholarship/

    Need-based Scholarships

    Kids Chance Scholarship

    Applicants are required to be a student and legal resident of Alabama. To qualify, one or both parents must have been permanently disabled or killed in a workplace accident. Students can apply for this scholarship each year they are enrolled in a university.

    Amount: $500 to $2,500

    Deadline: May 1, 2019

    Additional information and application: https://www.alabamalawfoundation.org/scholarships/kids-chance/

    Military Scholarships

    Alabama GI Dependents’ Education Benefit Program

    This scholarship is available for Alabama dependents of an eligible, disabled Alabama veteran. In addition to tuition and other fees, this award also assists in paying for textbooks.

    Amount: Tuition, Fees, and Text Book Assistance

    Deadline: None

    Additional information and application: http://www.va.alabama.gov/pdf/guides/scholarship.pdf

    General Scholarships

    “Countdown to College” Scholarship

    This scholarship has one requirement. Applicants must be an Alabama High School student with a subscription to the “Countdown to College” free weekly eNewsletter. Once registered, you will be automatically submitted.

    Amount: $1,000

    Deadline: May 4, 2019

    Additional information and application: http://www.potentialmagazine.com/national-countdown-to-college-scholarship-rules-and-requirements/

    MKH Lawyers Driver Safety Scholarship

    In addition to being an Alabama High School senior, applicants must submit an original essay detailing the dangers of texting and driving. Along with methods on how to spread awareness of these dangers. Throughout the essay, applicants must discuss public awareness strategies and practical ways to reduce automobile accidents.

    Amount: 3 Awards of $1,000 – $2,000

    Deadline: April 12, 2019

    Additional information and application: https://www.mkhlawyers.com/scholarship/#apply

    Paradigm Challenge

    For this scholarship, you must create an original, creative solution for common problems that affect students. Submissions must be presented in the form of posters, videos, events, websites or applications. Altogether, your strategy must be made clear in order to qualify. Applicants may work with a team if they wish.

    Amount: $100,000

    Deadline: May 5, 2019

    Additional information and application: https://www.projectparadigm.org/

    Heritage Scholarships

    KASF (Korean-American Scholarship Foundation) – Southern Region

    This scholarship is open to applicants who plan to be a full-time student in one of the following states: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina or Tennessee. In addition, a minimum of a 3.0 GPA and a need for financial aid is required.

    Amount: $500 to $5,000

    Deadline: June 30, 2019 

    Additional information and application: www.kasf.org/southern


    A college education opens an extensive amount of doors, so don’t allow money to be the deciding factor.

    Find Additional General Scholarships here and Additional State-Based  Scholarships here!

  • Health

    Buying healthy groceries on a budget

    Eating healthy may seem difficult when you find yourself always going over your weekly budget and it always seems like healthy food cost twice as much as junk food. Healthy eating shouldn’t be hard and you should be able to buy the groceries that you want without spending too much. So how do you ditch the Ramen noodles and buy food that will fuel your body and give you all the nutrients it needs?

    Grocery Cart With Item

    Make a list and set a spending limit:

    It may seem like simple advice but making a list of your favorite healthy foods will keep you focused. You won’t be grabbing anything and everything that you see off the shelves. Every time I make a list I feel like I have no other choice but to stick with it. Another tip, use a calculator. This will give you a range of how much your groceries will cost so that you don’t end up overspending. Trust me, that has happened to me way too many times.

    Avoid Junk Food:

    No matter how bad those chips are calling your name, don’t give in. You will this save money, AND it will keep you from midnight snacking on foods full of salt and fat. Those shiny wrappers are wrapped around processed food that has a long shelf life but will not be beneficial to you, whatsoever. So focus on groceries that are more organic and stray away from foods that have 20 ingredients or more.

    Don’t by ALL your fruit and veggies fresh:

    Frozen and canned fruits and veggies are a lifesaver.  Not only do they last extremely long, but they are so CHEAP! Frozen fruit does not get rotten fast and has a lot more flavor packed into it. Canned veggies are fast, easy, and will save you a lot of money. If you can’t buy all of them fresh then these are alternatives that will still keep you on track to being healthy

    Get some grains:

    Rice is so cheap. It is a perfect side to any meal and can be made in less than ten minutes. If you are trying to eat healthy brown rice will give you the whole grain you need and keep you full long longer.

    Don’t go to the store hungry:

    I’ve found myself buying way more groceries than I needed for the week only because I was hungry, so make sure you aren’t starving when you are perusing the aisles.

    Budgeting is not easy, especially when you could easily buy cheap food that will seemingly agree more with your bank account but, if you actually take a few moments to plan your grocery store trip you can successfully walk away without a dent in your bank account and a full grocery cart.

  • Lifestyle

    Coping with Short-Lived Poverty

    Coping with Short-Lived Poverty

    To this day, I refuse to eat spaghetti in any form. When boxes of noodles are 2 for a dollar and the pasta sauce is only 95 cents, you just have to suck it up. I remember my mom would jokingly ask us what we wanted for dinner at night, and before we could even say anything she was halfway finished with cooking another pot of noodles. Sometimes she would switch it up and we would have four canned vegetables and maybe some mashed potatoes.

    Though the food situation was not ideal, it was manageable. The real problem came with needing clothes, school supplies, and wanting to do extracurricular activities. Our household income was only a thousand dollars more than what the state considered to be in need of free lunches and EBT cards. At the time I prayed for that to be the case because I was so embarrassed that I would have the lunch lady say aloud how poor I was every time she rang up my food. But as I get older, I understand that it would have been better for my parents and for me had we been offered those assists.

    When you are used to one life style and then quickly have to adjust to a new one it’s never easy. I ended up taking on two after school jobs and an internship to help pay for the things I wanted most, and then did without the things that were not so important. I joined my school’s Show Choir and was able to make the $60 monthly payments by doing fundraisers. I won every fundraiser that my group did, because I knew that I had to in order to stay in it. If you can’t find a job or don’t have the ability to fund-raise properly, then seek out sponsors. I asked a local restaurant to sponsor me and my softball team throughout school, and never had to worry about paying for equipment. When I wanted to go out of town with my friends, or even just go to the movies, I did odd jobs like gardening for my neighbors or cleaning some friends’ houses.

    If you are embarrassed of your situation, just consider that maybe you are not alone. Only one of my friends in high school knew how bad my situation was, and the rest were completely oblivious. It always made me wonder how many of them were just as good at hiding it.

    If you are worried about working and keeping up with your grades, then don’t seek an official job. Most part-time employers will work with your schedule, but sometimes you may need to look into less obvious work. I worked events on the weekends for companies that paid $20 an hour. I had little experience and was making a killing. I will add some links to those jobs down below if anyone is interested. The pay comes every 1-2 months, so make sure not to count on living paycheck to paycheck unless you work a ton of events back to back. Check with your local football or baseball stadium, sometimes the catering companies are hiring 15 and up to work weekends. Starting pay is typically pretty good and the work is not hard.

    Always make sure to ask a parent of guardian before starting a new job, because they deserve a say in what you are doing. If you are 15 years-old, then you will need a work permit that is approved by a legal guardian and your school. If you have a shopping addiction, then try working for a retail store that you like so that you can get that 15% or more discount.

    You should not be embarrassed to have a job while in school. It looks great on resumes, and lets future employers know that you can handle multiple tasks at once. If you pantry looks anything like mine did when I was in high school, you might want to consider the above suggestions.

    Links to employment:

  • Articles, Money

    What Teens Should Know About Taxes

    What Teens Should Know About Taxes

    If you have ever gone shopping then you know about sales tax, but do you know about every other tax under the sun? When you buy a house, rent an apartment, buy land, buy a car, pay for license plates, get a job, or have dinner, you are bound to pay some sort of tax. For some reason, general education does not focus enough on things that are relevant to students once they graduate high school, such as hidden tax fees.

    I recently purchased a car from a private seller and knew a little bit about taxing and that I should expect to pay it heavily on my new car. Yet, when I arrived at the dealer, I was met with a smaller amount to be paid than anticipated. Why was that, you may wonder? I was under the impression that sales tax (being around 9% or 10% in my state) was the average amount of taxes taken out of everything. I had been working multiple different jobs since graduating high school and never once stopped to ask what the percentage was being taken from my paychecks. I just accepted that the money would be automatically withdrawn and moved on.

    If someone had never purchased a car before (I.e. a recent graduate of high school or college), then finding out a tax needed to be paid at all might come as a shock. Fortunately, I had bought a car prior to this instance with my mother and had to pay taxes on it. The only problem is that the first time I bought a car, the tax was 10%, but this time it was only 3%. I asked the lady at the DMV (Department of Motor Vehicles) why the tax was different, and she explained to me that the state I live in only does a 3% tax on vehicles, and this was a recent change. I accepted the information, paid the due, and once again moved on.

    Here is some useful information to consider when making large purchases in Alabama:

     

    1. The sales tax in Alabama is pretty high compared to other states in the nation, and in the counties nearest me it is either 9% or 10%. This means that for every dollar you spend, you pay 10 cents in taxes. If you spend $10, you will pay $1 in taxes. This only applies when shopping.
    2. Do not assume you know the exact value of the taxes on your vehicle purchase. The state now assigns an estimated value for your vehicle and taxes it according to that. So, if you purchase a car for $5500, but it is valued at $6900, then you will be paying a 3% or 4% tax on $6900.
    3. Always, always research your local taxes before making large purchases, because taxes can change. Or there could be additional taxes that you may not have even known about.

     

    Here is a link for further knowledge of taxes:

    https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/irs-offers-tips-for-teenage-taxpayers-with-summer-jobs

  • Articles, work

    4 Ways To Earn Money As A High-School Student

    4 Ways To Earn Money As A High-School Student

    by Hanna Sha

    When you’re in high school, sometimes extra money really comes in handy. Maybe your allowance isn’t enough, or your parents just don’t give you any at all. There are many costs that need to be covered in high school: school dues, clothes, entertainment, etc. As a teen, you might want to earn some more cash, but it can be difficult trying to figure out where to get the money.

    Here are 4 simple ways to earn some cash.

     

    • Tutoring: If you enjoy teaching others and understand the material, tutoring is a great way to earn money and help others. Many students struggle with their subjects, and a lot of parents are looking for reasonably-priced tutors for their children. Find a tutoring organization to join, or just offer your tutor services to your community.
    • Babysit: Many parents often need others to look over their young children, especially if both work. You can ask your parents if their friends are in need of a babysitter, or ask around your neighborhood.
    • Turn your passions into a business: For example, if painting is a hobby of yours that you are super interested in, you could paint some that are for sale, and start a small business. You can sell it online or in person. Take things that you find joy in and make some money off of it.
    • Get a part-time job: Many restaurants, movie theaters, pools, and other small businesses accept high schoolers as their employees. Look for ads around your community, and ask upperclassmen or other friends about places looking for employees. If you’re 16 or older, it’s not hard to find one that will accept you. If you’re still 15 (or 14), then it becomes a little more difficult, but it is still possible.

     

    So, if you’re a teen in need of money, it’s definitely not impossible to earn some extra cash. Hope this helps your future endeavors!