Browsing Tag:

school

  • Articles, Fashion, GirlSpring.com, School

    School Dress Codes

    school dress code

    How do you dress for class when the latest fashion trends are crop tops and leggings? When sitting through eight plus hours of lessons, the last thing you want to do is worry about what you look like. Yet with strict school dress codes for young girls, the pressure is on.

    Why is it fair that your ability to learn is determined by how long your skirt is?

    I was once sent to the principle’s office because my shirt was considered inappropriate. The principle took one look at my shirt and asked what the problem was. I had to explain that the teacher didn’t agree with the words printed on it. The shirt sported lyrics from a popular song at the time and were in no way derogatory, unless you believe the words “I’m only going to break you heart” should be banned.

    It is ridiculous the obstacles that females must jump through just to stay at school all day. If the public-school systems weighed our education over our appearances, we would surely have a better chance with our studies.

    The rules for measurement are based on how long or short your appendages are. The inability to wear clothes that are more suited for warmer climates is almost a punishment. Not to mention the amount of time and money that goes into finding “school-appropriate” clothing.

    You spend the whole summer wearing the things that feel comfortable on your body and make sense for the climate. Then you start back to school with a closet full of useless clothing.

    It might be a little different if classes started later in August or even after Labor Day like some colleges, but when school starts in the middle of the Summer season, shorts are inevitable.

    Here are some tips to survive this school year’s dress code:

    • Only buy ten items. Try to make the items interchangeable outfits. Finding plain clothing and adding accessories can help.
    • Find one store that has almost everything you need. Mine is Torrid. There are always clearance items and the clothing fits my body well. Not to mention, accessories and shoes come in abundance.
    • If you buy articles of clothing that would be considered revealing, wear leggings/colored pantyhose underneath. Or you can buy a cover-over (a cardigan, sweater, jacket, etc.).
    • Keep a spare T-shirt or pair of pants in your locker or backpack in case of wardrobe violation. This helps avoid the humiliation of having to wear gym clothes/lost-in-found clothes or having to go home for the rest of the day.
    • You may not be able to wear a crop top by itself, but turtlenecks, tank tops, and t shirts can be placed underneath one to make a cute statement.
    • You probably can’t wear leggings by themselves. Sweat pants, joggers, and other not-form-fitting workout pants can be comfortable to wear. Also, jeggings are not technically leggings, but can fit and feel just the same.

    Try reading over your school’s dress code to figure out what you can and can’t get away with. Some schools differ from others, which means yours might not have as strict of rules or it might be more strict than neighboring schools.

    Part of getting back to school ready is having your closet ready to go! Get ready with this video on how to polish your wardrobe. 

  • Articles, College, GirlSpring.com, School

    Deciding What to Study in College

    what to study in college

    Throughout our childhood and into our high school and college years, many of us are asked the question: “What do you want to be when you grow up?”

    In first grade, I probably answered this question with, “I want to be an artist!” because I loved spending hours after school each day creating “masterpieces” using my markers and colored pencils. However, as I started middle school, I soon realized that I was very interested in science. I loved how applicable it was to real life, and the fact that there was so much still to be discovered intrigued me. By the end of middle school, I was pretty confident that I wanted to be a doctor one day. I was fascinated with medicine and loved listening to others and offering advice.

    This didn’t change in high school, and it made choosing a major when applying to college fairly easy for me. I took several STEM courses over my high school years, and I pursued my medical interests through my extracurricular activities (in addition to exploring other areas of interest as well). Although this process was fairly straightforward for me, I can’t say it was the same for some of my peers.

    For many, high school offers a small introduction to the vast array of opportunities out there in the world.

    Most elementary and middle schools only offer the four basic subjects: math, science, social studies, and English. This is good, but very broad. In high school, students have the opportunity to take more specialized courses within each of these subject areas. There are courses like psychology, computer science, economics, and foreign languages. These can give individuals interested in pursuing a college education a better idea of what they might want to study in the future. In addition, through a multitude of clubs and extracurricular opportunities available, high school students can get involved in activities that allow them to further explore and develop their passions. Although high school gives students an opportunity to explore a variety of subject areas and experiences, I feel that it is still tough for some students to be certain of what they want to study in college since high school is mostly a time of exploration.

    Nowadays, most colleges don’t require an individual to commit to the major they list on their application (which I think is great).

    In fact, many colleges don’t require a student to declare a major until the end of their sophomore year. This gives a student time during college to explore their passions and interests and decide accordingly. Some colleges might ask students to simply list broad subject areas they may be interested in studying, which lets students know that they are not committing themselves to something they are interested in at the moment for the entirety of college.

    According to the National Center for Education Statistics, 80% of college students change their major at least once. With such a high statistic, it is important to realize that many students are unsure of what they would like to study or do with their lives. Most haven’t had the opportunity to truly interact with and understand everything available to them until they’re in college. Today, many people stress the importance of setting goals and developing a detailed life plan from early on. Although this methodology is useful and may be beneficial for some individuals, it is not the best for everyone. Life is about having new experiences and doing things that make one happy. If this is a process that takes time for an individual, it shouldn’t automatically be considered unproductive or bad.

    Students are encouraged to make quick decisions. For many, I feel that it would be more helpful if they slowed down and took time to truly interact with the opportunities available to them. That way, they can make a more educated decision on what they want to study.

    Ultimately, I think it is most important for students to not feel stressed out or feel “behind”

    Just because you haven’t decided what you want to do with your life doesn’t mean you aren’t where you need to be. Each individual is unique, and we all have our own pace in which we go about doing things.

    My recommendation for high school students is as follows: this the time to explore opportunities available to you and chase your passions. When applying to college, reflect on what you enjoyed learning and doing in high school. This could be an indication of what you may be interested in studying. Use your first year of college (as I will also do this upcoming school year!) to decide whether you are enjoying the program you indicated interest in or would like to study something else. Overall, make sure you are finding value and enjoyment in what you are putting your time and effort towards.

    When you’re in high school, it’s always a good idea to keep college in the back of your mind. Here is some college advice geared to upcoming high school freshmen.

  • Articles, College, Confidence, School

    5 Things I Wish I Could Tell my High-School Self

    high school advice

    5 Things I Wish I Could Tell My High School Self

     

    If I had the choice to travel back in time to my first day of high school, to do everything differently, there’s no way I would do it. High school played its part in shaping me into the woman I am today. If I had a choice to send a letter to my 14-year-old self, however, I would give that girl supporting words and advice on how to carry herself. Words that I think every high-schooler should live by.

    Be okay with being alone.

    You’ll run into days when it feels like nobody is on the same wavelength as you like everyone else lives in a different dimension. Don’t strain yourself to fit in with the “cool” group. Don’t try to find a boyfriend because it’s what everyone else is doing. You’re always going to be your own best friend, so the sooner you accept yourself for everything you are and everything you’ll become, the sweeter life will be.

    Get comfortable with being uncomfortable.

    This is going to play a big part in preparing you for life outside of high school. Ask yourself, what’s the worst thing that could happen? Take risks. When you challenge yourself and push your own boundaries, you open the door for beautiful, unexpected things to happen.

    Don’t worry what others think of you.

    Tell yourself this every morning when you wake up. And again in the middle of the day. And again. And again. Everyone is so concerned with what they’re doing and how they’re portrayed during high school, not what others are doing. Focusing on your own happiness and success will lead to the best memories.

    Stop worrying about the future.

    I was notorious for this in high school, and consequently, it tainted my final two years. Trust me, you’ll do well on that test. You’ll be accepted into a good college. You’ll find a career doing something you love. There come a time and place to focus on those thoughts, but don’t stress out about it too much right now.

    Realize that high school doesn’t last forever.

    You might not believe it right this moment, but you’re going to miss the hallways you stroll down each day. You’re going to miss those homework assignments because trust me, they get a lot harder. You’re going to miss seeing those familiar faces every day. While there may be some excruciatingly painful parts of high school, you never realize what you’re going to miss. Don’t take a minute of it for granted. Don’t be in such a hurry to grow up; be present in each moment.

    Just take the moment to soak it all in, because when you look back you’ll think that is so high school. Think about that and other advice in the article “It Will All Be Over Soon.” 

  • Articles, GirlSpring.com, work

    Career Aptitude Testing

    career aptitude

    Sometime in your middle and high school years you will be asked to participate in career aptitude testing. This means you will be sat down with a booklet in front of you and a bunch of answer bubbles to fill out that could possibly determine your future. The test can be stressful whether you have an idea of what you would like to do after graduation or not.

    It’s A Test, But Not Really

    The best thing to keep in mind while filling out your answers it to be honest. The test is not for a grade. It does not determine whether you pass a class or not. This test is just trying to help you figure out some possible career choices. It bases its analysis on what you answer. What you like versus what you do not like. It is a simple algorithm that could help save you the trouble of guessing what on earth you should do with your life.

    When the results come in, you do not have to agree with them. There will likely be several career options listed, and some of them may be more similar than others. This just means that for the similar ones, you must have liked 70% or more of the things required for those jobs.

    What To Do After You Get the Results Back

    Try not to discard the test before checking into the results. The employment options given could be work fields that you may not have considered otherwise. It would be in your best interest to give them a chance, even if it is a small chance. Google can quickly give you the information you are looking for.

    If you find that some of the career options seem interesting, then you can move on a step. Check to see if there are local businesses that offer those type of jobs. Then, you can reach out to those businesses and ask to interview an employee or even request to job shadow someone. Job shadowing is just taking the time to watch the employee work for a couple of hours. It can go on for one hour or if the person working agrees to a longer period, it could last for several days.

    When interviewing or shadowing, try to take note of the things you did not know were required for that job. Ask them questions about other things that they did not know before getting into their field of work. Find out how much school and time goes into the position.

    If you are in high school, you may be able to ask for an internship if there are any available. Explore as many different work fields as possible before settling on one. This way you can experience the variety of options available to you, and can determine which best suits you. If you get a head start before entering college, you may be able to save yourself a lot of time and money.

    An Opportunity to Explore

    There is currently an opportunity available to you, if you are interested in pursuing a career in writing of any kind. This site, GirlSpring, is always on the lookout for new talent to showcase. Even if you do not know if writing is for you, just give it a try. Everyone has something they would like to say, so why not use this platform to be heard? It would be a great addition to any resume and gives you a feel for whether it is something you could pursue for career purposes.

    At the end of the day, if you still are unsure what career choice you should make, do not worry. You are young and have plenty of time to try out different things. I know some people who are in their sixties and are back in college for a career change. You can easily get a degree that covers many different fields. I, for one, am an English major. I plan to pursue writing, editing, teaching, researching languages, event planning, and marketing.

    Here are some extra links to check out if you want to try an aptitude test on your own:

    https://www.whatcareerisrightforme.com/career-aptitude-test.php

    https://www.yourfreecareertest.com/

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/ashleyperez/what-career-should-you-have

  • GirlSpring.com, Stress

    Kick Stress to the Curb!

    Stress Management

    Kick Stress to the Curb

    & Kick Butt at Life!

    Students are exposed to a barrage of stressors during the college experience, from growing pains associated with adjusting to college to everyday factors like social pressures and work responsibilities.

    A 2016 poll conducted by the American College Health Association found that 34.4% of college students reported that stress had negatively impacted their academic performance over the past 12 months.

    Stress was the single most common inhibitor on academic performance reported by students, followed by depression, anxiety, and sleep difficulties.

    These increased stress levels come with some dire consequences.

    College students exposed to chronic stress can suffer from several long-term side effects, including developing insulin-dependent diabetes.

    Additionally, suicide rates amongst college-aged students are three times higher than they were in 1950, as described by the American College Health Association statistics published in Psychology Today.

    The number of college students who suffer from stress-related ailments appears to be on the rise.

    According to the National Center for Education Statistics, enrollment in degree-granting institutions increased by 11% from 1991–2001 and another 32% from 2001–2011. What’s more, survey data from the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors suggests that many large institutions have not attained pre-2008 recession budgets. The cards are stacked against counseling centers that have lower budgets and fewer resources that must help more students than in the past.

    Occasional stress is an unavoidable part of everyday life.

    Small amounts of stress can even have a positive effect, allowing us to push ourselves when we encounter a difficult task.

    However, high levels of stress over a prolonged period of time are linked to increased rates of depression, anxiety, cardiovascular disease, and other potentially life-threatening issues. This makes it all the more important to learn how to manage your stress before you suffer any adverse effects.

    The following guide will introduce you to potential stress risks, stress management techniques, and resources that are available to all college students.

    https://www.bestcolleges.com/resources/balancing-stress/

    https://www.bestcolleges.com/resources/student-healthcare-guide/

    For more information on this topic and more, visit BestColleges.com

  • GirlSpring.com

    2019 Best Affordable Prom Dress Websites

    Best Prom Dress

    Affordable Prom Dress Websites

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    Prom Girl

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  • School

    Religion in Schools: Good or Bad?

    The debate about the role of religion in public schools is decades long.

    The goal of a school system is to educate and encourage the youth to be a functioning part of society. In some cases, teachers and students feel that religion is a necessary part of that. The necessity stems from the belief that religion provides morals for people to abide. I believe that any one person can obtain decent morals without religion, as so many have. In my opinion, a secular environment with the option to practice your faith is the best option for schools.

    The law requires teachers to remain separate from their beliefs when teaching academics.

    It is okay for them to be religious, and they can express their faith when appropriate. However, teachers are not allowed to push their beliefs. The same rules apply to the students. If the lesson discusses a religion, then any answers or questions about said religion is appropriate to ask. However, if the lesson is about another subject that has not mentioned a religion, then it is discouraged to bring it up. You cannot teach one specific religion as correct and others as incorrect.

    These rules provide a comfortable learning environment for all teachers and students who may or may not participate in religion. The problem stemming from some schools is a lack of respect for fellow students and teachers who share different beliefs.

    I grew up going to a school that was heavily geared towards Christianity and was in a southern town. 

    I acknowledge that this does not mean that all schools in southern towns act in the same way. There were instances where students felt threatened by the idea that another student could stop in the middle of class to participate in their faith. The students began arguing that if one faith should have a certain right, then all faiths should have it. While this is not necessarily a wrong theory, its painted in hatred and misunderstanding.

    The angry students failed to see that they had just as many opportunities to practice their faith as the other students and even sometimes more freedom.

    Students who need to pray at certain times of day were given that right. The students that followed separate faiths in which they were not required to pray at specific hours of the day were not given that courtesy, because they were not religiously bound to it.

    Christianity in many forms is practiced in schools. Some of which are:

    -Fellowship of Christian Athletes clubs (which I discovered were not exclusive to athletes despite the name),

    -Meet Me at the Pole days once a semester or once a year,

    -Religious music within choir groups,

    -Bowing their head and pray in the middle of the day at any time.

    Practicing my religion never once scared or worried me. It was the dominating faith at my school. There were kids in my school who believed differently than me.  They wanted to practice their faith without harassment. However, they were met with anger and fear.

    As for the argument that some religions are dangerous to students, try being a little more informative before making such accusations.

    The law requires public schools to allow students to participate in their religion. This is true unless certain aspects of their religion are harmful to the student body. If someone’s beliefs were truly harmful to you, then it would not be any different than another student bringing a weapon or harmful words to school. Schools have a code of conduct rules. Regardless of religion, weapons, harassment, or any kind of harmful act is obviously prohibited.

    Consider what you are doing if you try to prevent another student from participating in their faith. You are not only harassing them, but you are causing harm to their learning abilities. They just want to get through school just the same as you. If you disagree with something they say, think about how they must feel when you talk about what you believe.

    Here are some links to check out regarding your rights:

    Religious Freedom in Public Schools: https://www.aclund.org/en/news/do-you-know-your-religious-freedom-rights-school

    Department of Education Religious Protections: https://www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/us-department-education-takes-actions-address-religious-discrimination

    Are you the victim of harassment? https://www.employmentlawyernewyork.com/news/latest/religious-harassment-am-i-a-victim.html

    Identifying religious discrimination: https://www.adl.org/education/resources/tools-and-strategies/religion-in-public-schools/clubs

     

    Check out some of your school’s clubs to see if one matches with your beliefs. This will help you find some friends that you can relate to. Try also sitting in on other religious gatherings to understand the other students better. This goes for all religions (if you are comfortable enough to do so).

    If you would like to share your opinion on this topic, please leave a comment below this article. It is important to have open discussions about these types of things because it leads to change that sometimes betters our environment.