Browsing Tag:

women

  • Articles, GirlSpring.com, Music

    The Women of Country Music are Fixing its Bad Reputation

    country music

    Everywhere I go I hear, “country music is disgusting” or “all country singers talk about is treating girls badly, their trucks, and beer.” But in reality, country music is one of the longest lasting forms of music. In fact, it began to form sometime in the 1920s out of a blend of American Folk Music and the Blues.

    Being myself an avid country music listener, I mostly hear singers talk about how much they love their partners or how they wish the world was a better place. So I ask: Why does country music get such a bad reputation? Maybe it’s because everyone needs something to hate on and country music is just the easy victim. Maybe it’s because of the fact that it is indeed a male-dominated genre. However, with a new breed of female country singers such as Kelsey Ballerini, Maren Morris, and Kacey Musgrave, I think there is a great group of women to revive country music from its preconceived reputation.

    Another up and coming Country Music Star is Ciera Mackenzie! Check out our interview with the talented singer and take a listen to her amazing music in the video below:

  • GirlSpring.com, Movie Review

    Reviewing the Netflix Original Documentary – Period. End of Sentence.

    period end of sentence

    Period. End of Sentence.

    A Review of the Netflix Original Documentary by Suneeti Chambers

    As I was browsing Netflix one day, I saw the preview of a documentary called Period. End of Sentence.

    Since I have a passion and an interest in women’s health, I felt that this was a documentary I would learn a lot from and enjoy.

    After watching it, I discovered that I was right!

    The documentary takes place in India and talks about a significant topic that is considered ‘taboo’ in India: menstruation.

    As you watch the documentary, you can see the awkwardness and uncomfortableness that the women and girls show when asked about the topic of menstruation. You can immediately tell how little attention this health topic is given, despite its extreme importance. Even men are asked about periods and menstruation, and they express a lack of knowledge concerning the subject.

    Furthermore, many women India resort to unhygienic ways to take care of their period, as seen in the documentary.

    To combat this problem, an Indian man by the name of Arunachalam Muruganantham has created a machine which creates pads. It is a relatively simple machine but it is able to create pads that are abundant in quality and quantity. Then, he got people to teach women from certain villages how to work the machines and create their own pads.

    From there on, the documentary shows women with an entrepreneurial spirit, selling their own pads and getting their own money. The pride and happiness seen in these women’s faces prove that nothing can get in the way of the perseverance and power of women. The documentary has reminded me to be proud to be part Indian and to be a woman.

    Most of all, it has reminded me that we should never hesitate to change the status quo!

  • Articles

    Women’s March 2019!!

    Women's March

    This year I had the opportunity to attend the 2019 Women’s March in Philadelphia along with three of my closest friends.

    Public events such as the women’s march are essential. They are one of the best ways to bring people and communities together to discuss and stand up for change. I truly believe that events such as marches, conventions, protests, and conferences are the best way to peacefully inspire and motivate individuals. To make a change and create a spark in their community, peaceful movements are important. Walking side by side with so many incredible people, to uplift and celebrate women, was an unforgettable experience.     

     

    Throughout the day, activists shared speeches about their passions, stories, and journey to becoming an activist. My friends and I had the opportunity to speak with activist Yashira Marie Rivera. Rivera found her love for activism at the young age of 13. Her words were moving and encouraged me to continue to fight and advocate for the rights and equality of women all around the world.

     

    Along with Yashira, we also heard a speech from a 17-year-old girl.  She started a campaign against climate change and the detrimental impacts of environmental racism. Even though this activist is only 17 years old, she has already been able to accomplish so much in such a short amount of time. Her work and motivation have bettered the lives of many people within her community in University City in Philadelphia. More importantly, she has made a difference in the lives of people in communities less fortunate than hers. She has recognized that because she does have a very privileged life. Therefore she is doing everything in her power to help as many people her life will allow.

     

    At the march, it was reassuring to see the men that were participating in the event as well. It is vital for men to recognize the need for women’s rights and make a change in support of women.

     

    I was touched to see all of the children holding up signs and marching with their parents. In this day and age, I believe it is important to start educating children about societal issues and instill these lessons in them when children are young.

     

    Attending the Women’s March only increased my love of activism and has made my desire to help others even stronger. Next year I am planning on participating in the Women’s March in Washington D.C., and I am already looking forward to experiencing another day full of the positivity and empowerment that we very much need for our country to move forward.

     

  • Woman's History

    Women in History to be Thankful For

    Women in History to be Thankful For

    by Sarah Vice, intern for GirlSpring

    I am thankful for women’s rights and for the women who stood up and spoke out in favor of those rights. You always hear people saying to give thanks for the veterans that defend our freedom, which I am thankful. I am eternally grateful to all people who stand up and fight for me. But this does not stop at war veterans. This includes the women in history and today who put their lives or livelihoods at risk just so that we can have equal rights.

    I wouldn’t be able to write this post if it were not for a long list of women who fought for freedom of speech, freedom of the press, women’s rights, and a strong sense of leadership. Some honorable mentions are below.

    Susan B. Anthony

    Some of these names might be familiar to you. That’s good. We can start with the earliest member of the list, Susan B. Anthony. Recently, the midterm elections led a flock of people to leave their “voting” stickers on her memorial stone.

    By the age of 17, Anthony was already involved with pushing anti-slavery petitions. She was young, but she knew what was right versus what was wrong. In 1863, she had nearly 400,000 people sign a petition to abolish slavery. In 1866, Anthony and Elizabeth Stanton created the American Equal Rights Association, which boasted freedom for both women and people of color. At the age of 46, Anthony began a newspaper in support of women’s rights.

    In 1872, Anthony was arrested for voting. Can you imagine the bravery it would take to risk remaining in jail the rest of your days so that you could have a single vote in an election? But that’s not all it was. It was not just a single vote. It was a vote for womankind and the demand for the right to have a voice. Because of her bravery, I received the right to vote from the legal age of 18. This is one reason why I vote. Because it was not a given, it was a battle to have that right.

    Harriet Tubman

    The next woman on the list that I am thankful for is Harriet Tubman. This woman was abused from a young age. She legally belonged to someone. If that sentence doesn’t break your heart and enrage you, then you do not deserve her bravery. Tubman broke free of her chains, and instead of moving on with her newfound freedom, she chose to keep coming back for those she loved and eventually other slaves. She didn’t find the time to pity herself. She was so busy saving as many people as she could through the Underground Railroad.

    Once the Civil War began, Tubman served as a spy for the United States Army. In doing so, I am sure countless lives were spared and brought free from their bonds. Her courage goes on into fighting for women’s rights. In response to the question of why women should be given the right to vote, Tubman exclaimed that her suffering gave her the right to it. She continued her life in support of women’s activist groups and the suffragist movement.

    Clara Barton

    The list continues to pattern women of strength and courage. Clara Barton was none too shy of showing the world what women are capable of. She brought the American Red Cross to America in 1864. After years of military nursing experience, it was time for Clara to begin heading a major organization that would later become the largest disaster relief in Northern America. Even now, the name is probably familiar with recent catastrophes or blood drives.

    Though Barton’s take on the American Red Cross was dismissed by the belief that her humanitarian efforts would drag the organization down—by a male-dominated board—she resumed trying to memorialize the brave women from the war. She would later create a new foundation that would aid in local relief. It was called the National First Aid Society.

    These three women are part of a long list of independent thinkers who found a way to give us a better present and future. The list will continue to grow as young girls like yourselves are inspired by the work of others. If something seems hard now, just consider what the reward will be for those who come after you. Be selfless and selfish all the same.

    So this holiday, as you are passing the turkey around and drooling over that sweet potato pie, remember to give thanks to those who have made improvements in your life and the lives of others.

    Have a Happy Thanksgiving!

  • GirlSpring.com, TRENDING, Woman's History

    Get to Know the Women from the 2018 Midterm Elections Who Made History

    Jeannette Rankin began breaking ground in 1917 as the first woman in history in the House of Representatives. She was also one of the key people in pushing the 19th Congressional Amendment, which allowed women to have equal voting rights. Now, thanks to her bravery and devotion to women’s rights, we have a record-breaking number of women recently elected to Congress.

     

     

    On November 6th, 2018, a remarkable number of women were elected to Congress, making the overall number of women representing the House more than 100. It doesn’t stop there, either. The 2018 midterm elections were followed by several firsts.

    Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar are the first Muslim women elected to Congress. Tlaib will be America’s first Palestinian-American congresswoman, and Omar will be the first Somali-American congresswoman. Rashida Tlaib is a lawyer and a politician. She previously served a full term as a Democratic member of Michigan’s House of Representatives.  She won the recent election with over 136,000 votes uncontested. She is a single mother of two sons. She once was removed from a venue where President Trump was being honored with an official Purple Heart. She claimed that he had not earned it. She stood her ground and was escorted respectfully.

    Ilhan Omar was the first non-white woman elected to Minnesota’s House of Representatives and is the first Muslin refugee to be elected. Omar won the election with more than 267,000 votes. Omar was once a member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party in Minnesota and was nominated as a rising star in the Party’s Women’s Hall of Fame. She also lives happily with her husband and three children. She spent four years in a refugee camp in Kenya in the early ‘90’s after the start of the war. After immigrating to the states in 1995, Omar was able to learn the English language in less than three months. She graduated with a degree in political science and international studies from the University of North Dakota in 2011.

    Sharice Davids and Deb Haaland are the first Native American congresswomen. Davids is not only a member of the Native American Ho-Chunk nation, making congressional history, but she is also the first publicly declared lesbian in Congress and a former professional MMA fighter. Davids is a strong young woman who chose to leave MMA fighting in 2013 to follow her democratic political dreams in representing Kansas in Congress. She received her Juris Doctor—degree in Indian law—from Cornell Law School in 2009. She won over 164,000 votes in the midterm election.

    Deb Haaland is a member of the Laguna Pueblo people from New Mexico. She received a bachelors in English and continued onto graduate school to claim her Juris Doctor degree from the University of New Mexico Law School. Haaland is a single mother who enjoys running marathons and gourmet cooking.

    Marsha Blackburn is Tennessee’s first woman elected to Senate. Blackburn brandishes herself as a conservative Republican. She has been a member of Tennessee’s Senate, and a U.S. Representative for Tennessee’s 7th congressional district. She is a strong supporter of “traditional marriage,” pro-life, and non-government-controlled healthcare. She is a former member of the Smithsonian Libraries Advisory Board and is married with two children.

    Janet Mills is elected Maine’s first female governor. She ran as part of the democratic party and earned 318,000 votes in the election, winning by nearly 7%. She was an assistant attorney general and then the district attorney for three counties in Maine. She was the first woman elected to be Maine’s district attorney. She is the widowed mother of five stepdaughters and has three grandsons.

    Ayanna Pressley is the first black person elected into Massachusetts’s House of Representatives. She is the first female black women elected to Congress. Pressley was raised by her mother who worked incredibly hard to give her a better life. Pressley was a cheerleader in high school and did some voice-over work for Planned Parenthood advertisements. She supports the “take a knee” movement that gives recognition of the U.S.’s need for equality. Pressley is also a survivor of sexual crimes in which she fights against for herself and other young women. She believes that the states should defund the Immigration and Customs Enforcement laws as they endanger immigrant communities.

    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is the youngest woman elected into Congress at age 29. She will be representing New York’s 14th Congressional district beginning January 2019. She ran as part of the democratic party. In high school, Ocasio-Cortez had a small asteroid named after her when she won second place for a research project on microbiology during the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. After facing financial struggles shortly after high school, she was awarded funds from Sunshine Bronx Business Incubator, which allowed her to start a small publishing firm. She went on to be an educator for the National Hispanic Institute, which is a non-profit organization. Ocasio-cortex supports free education for universities and colleges. She supports 100% renewable energy sources. She is for the impeachment of Trump and would like to the U.S. Customs and Enforcement agency to be abolished.

    Abbey Finkenauer is the first woman to represent Iowa in Congress. She is a member of the democratic party. She received her bachelor’s degree in Public Relations from Drake University in Iowa. She was endorsed by Barack Obama in her candidacy for this year’s midterms. She is the second youngest woman to be elected into Congress at age 30, following Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, age 29.

    Let these women represent everything that you can achieve in life. If someone says you can’t, or if the world feels like it’s against you, do not back down. Women in history have worked hard to get us to where we are today, and these newly elected women will help lead that venture. We are strong. We are smart. We are women.

  • Articles, Confidence, Woman's History

    My Women’s March Experience

    In celebration of Women’s History month, I have decided to submit an article that I wrote after going to the 2017 women’s march on Washington in Birmingham. I think that the Women’s marches that occurred earlier this year will be remembered during March in many years to come.

    Last Saturday I attended the Women’s march on Birmingham. My mom had made a sign; she was the one who really convinced me to go. It (the sign) was quite well made, with letters printed from vinyl spelling out “WOMEN’S RIGHTS ARE HUMAN RIGHTS” proudly across the colorful poster board She forgot to cut the apostrophe out of vinyl, so we had to add it later with a ballpoint pen. I don’t think anyone noticed, though.

    5,000. That was the estimated number of people who came. 10,000 feet marching. I didn’t expect so many people to march. In fact, I was considerably skeptical about the whole thing at first. I thought,” What difference can it make?” and “If I don’t go, will it really matter?” But, the experience of walking alongside thousands of fellow humans all united for a common cause (as millions did so around our country) was what really changed my mind.

    I arrived with my parents in my dad’s black Ford about 30 minutes before the speakers were scheduled to take the stage. We had to park in a lot a few blocks away from Kelly Ingram park, on account of the tremendous number of cars that had poured in for the sole purpose of transporting people to the march. That’s why I wasn’t that upset that we had to park in a less convenient spot, as I knew that the lack of parking spaces meant that more people were getting out and doing something.

    As we paid our parking fee, kind people spoke to us as if we were their best friends. They asked us if we were going to the march, and were so neighborly and cordial. That was my first experience with the genuine love that was radiating from everyone at the march, heard through confident footsteps and wide, welcoming smiles and echoing throughout the city. I think that feeling may have echoed throughout the entire country that day.

    After paying for parking we strode to where everyone was collecting, seeing others on the streets with signs in hand doing the same.

    Once we reached out destination I finally realized the magnitude of this gathering. A flock of activists being active, all happily conversing and anticipating the march. I could feel the energy, poetic and passionate, the excitement in the air. As I walked around, waving hello to faces I recognized, a teen girl about my age high fived me. Did I wonder why, why this friendly display of comradery? Maybe it was the rainbow I had painted (with watered down eyeshadow) across my cheek, or the “youth pride” button I had pinned to my chest. Maybe it was that I was just there. Yes, I think it was the latter.

    The speakers spoke for a relatively long time, once they finally called everyone to attention. The crowd was large and impatient for the march to start, hoisting up their signs in recognition of words or phrases they signified with. Some songs were sung, but there was a silent consensus among the group that we all just wanted to start marching.

    Finally, I was time to march. I was careful not to lose my parents in the crowd as it shifted to facing toward the road and made its way to the march’s starting point. The mass was dense, so much so that it was hard for me to see exactly where we were heading but I shuffled along with everyone else nevertheless. Then my foot stepped onto the concrete road as my hand was curled, fist like around my sign, and I began to march.

    The march was powerful. It was lively, colorful, happy, and invigorating. It was a brilliant display of human unity. I knew this right as I stepped into Kelly Ingram park when all my skepticism left me. We flew through the streets, birds in motion, out vibrant wings pigmented with the hues of our hearts. It was utterly massive. As I walked down one street I could see another portion of the group marching down another. We were a chain, curling and weaving around streets and parks and parking lots. Everyone joined together. Strong. We chanted and sang, those without signs held up fists, all our voices melting into one. Being part of this march really changed my viewpoints that I had previously had. I don’t wonder if I can make a difference anymore. No, I tell myself I must.