Browsing Tag:

cyberbullying

  • Bullying, School

    What You Can Do

    Are you being bullied? Do you see bullying at your school? There are things you can do to keep yourself and the kids you know safe from bullying.

    Treat Everyone with Respect

    Nobody should be mean to others.

    • Stop and think before you say or do something that could hurt someone.
    • If you feel like being mean to someone, find something else to do. Play a game, watch TV, or talk to a friend.
    • Talk to an adult you trust. They can help you find ways to be nicer to others.
    • Keep in mind that everyone is different. Not better or worse. Just different.
    • If you think you have bullied someone in the past, apologize. Everyone feels better.

     

    What to Do If You’re Bullied

    There are things you can do if you are being bullied:

    • Look at the kid bullying you and tell him or her to stop in a calm, clear voice. You can also try to laugh it off. This works best if joking is easy for you. It could catch the kid bullying you off guard.
    • If speaking up seems too hard or not safe, walk away and stay away. Don’t fight back. Find an adult to stop the bullying on the spot.

    There are things you can do to stay safe in the future, too.

    • Talk to an adult you trust. Don’t keep your feelings inside. Telling someone can help you feel less alone. They can help you make a plan to stop the bullying.
    • Stay away from places where bullying happens.
    • Stay near adults and other kids. Most bullying happens when adults aren’t around.

     

    Protect Yourself from Cyberbullying

    Bullying does not always happen in person. Cyberbullying is a type of bullying that happens online or through text messages or emails. There are things you can do to protect yourself.

      • Always think about what you post. You never know what someone will forward. Being kind to others online will help to keep you safe. Do not share anything that could hurt or embarrass anyone.
      • Keep your password a secret from other kids. Even kids that seem like friends could give your password away or use it in ways you don’t want. Let your parents have your passwords.
      • Think about who sees what you post online. Complete strangers? Friends? Friends of friends? Privacy settings let you control who sees what.
      • Keep your parents in the loop. Tell them what you’re doing online and who you’re doing it with. Let them friend or follow you. Listen to what they have to say about what is and isn’t okay to do. They care about you and want you to be safe.
      • Talk to an adult you trust about any messages you get or things you see online that make you sad or scared. If it is cyberbullying, report it.

     

    Stand Up for Others

    When you see bullying, there are safe things you can do to make it stop.

        • Talk to a parent, teacher, or another adult you trust. Adults need to know when bad things happen so they can help.
        • Be kind to the kid being bullied. Show them that you care by trying to include them. Sit with them at lunch or on the bus, talk to them at school, or invite them to do something. Just hanging out with them will help them know they aren’t alone.

    Not saying anything could make it worse for everyone. The kid who is bullying will think it is ok to keep treating others that way.

    Get Involved

    You can be a leader in preventing bullying in your community.

          • Find out more about where and when bullying happens at your school. Think about what could help. Then, share your ideas. There is a good chance that adults don’t know all of what happens. Your friends can go with you to talk to a teacher, counselor, coach, or parent and can add what they think.
          • Talk to the principal about getting involved at school. Schools sometimes give students a voice in programs to stop bullying. Be on a school safety committee. Create posters for your school about bullying. Be a role model for younger kids.
          • Write a blog, letter to the editor of your local newspaper, or tweet about bullying.

    From more information: stopbullying.gov

  • Bullying

    Anti-Bullying Information

    Here are some thing you need to do if you are being bullied:

    Don’t respond

    If someone bullies you, remember that your reaction is usually exactly what the bully wants. It gives him or her power over you. Who wants to empower a bully?

    Don’t retaliate

    Getting back at the bully turns you into one and reinforces the bully’s behavior. Help avoid a whole cycle of aggression.

    Save the evidence

    The only good news about digital bullying is that the harassing messages can usually be captured, saved, and shown to someone who can help. Save evidence even if it’s minor stuff – in case things escalate.

    Block the bully

    If the harassment’s coming in the form of instant messages, texts, or profile comments, do yourself a favor: Use preferences or privacy tools to block the person. If it’s in chat, leave the “room.” This may not end the problem, but you don’t need harassment in your face all the time, and no reaction sometimes makes aggressors bored so they’ll stop.

    Reach out for help

    You deserve backup. Of course you know there are different kinds of help, from talking with a friend to seeing if there’s a trusted adult who can help. It’s usually good to involve a parent but – if you can’t – a school counselor can sometimes be helpful. If you’re really nervous about saying something, see if there’s a way to report the incident anonymously at school. Sometimes this can result in bullies getting the help they need to change their behavior.

    Use reporting tools

    If the bullying took place via a social network, use that service’s reporting or “abuse” tools. The social network may also have “social abuse-reporting” tools, which allow you to forward hurtful content to a trusted friend or directly ask someone to take offensive content down. If the abuse threatens physical harm, you may have to call the police, but think about involving a parent if you do.

    Be civil

    You’re doing yourself a favor. Even if you don’t like a person, it’s a good idea to be decent and not sink to his or her level. Research shows that gossiping about and

    Don’t be a bully

    You know the old saying about walking a mile in someone’s shoes; even a few seconds of thinking about how another person might feel can put a big damper on aggression. That’s needed in this world.

    Be an upstander, not a bystander

    Forwarding mean messages or just standing by and doing nothing empowers bullies and hurts victims even more. If you can, tell bullies to stop, or let them know bullying is not cool – it’s cruel abuse of fellow human beings. If you can’t stop the bully, at least try to help the victim and report the behavior.

    From: Google

  • Bullying

    Cyberbullying

    Computers, cellphones, and other kinds of technology can be great. But sometimes they can be used to really hurt someone. Keep reading to learn more about cyberbullying:

    What is cyberbullying?

    Cyberbullying is hurting someone again and again using a computer, a cellphone, or another kind of electronic technology. Examples of cyberbullying include the following:

    • Texting or emailing insults or nasty rumors about someone
    • Posting mean comments about someone on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media sites
    • Threatening someone through email or other technology
    • Tricking someone into sharing embarrassing information
    • Forwarding private text messages to hurt or embarrass someone
    • Posting embarrassing photos or videos of someone
    • Pretending to be someone else online to get that person in trouble or embarrass her
    • Creating a website to make fun of someone

     

    Some teens think it’s easier to get away with bullying online than in person.

    Also, girls may be more likely to cyberbully than boys. Keep in mind that it’s pretty easy to find out who has been cyberbullying. In fact, cyberbullies can get in a lot of trouble with their schools, and possibly even with the police.

    Cyberbullying hurts.

    It can be easier to type something really mean than to say it to a person. But being cyberbullied can sometimes feel even worse than other kinds of bullying. That’s because cyberbullying can come at you anytime, anywhere and can reach a lot of people.

    Being cyberbullied can make you feel angry, afraid, helpless, and terribly sad. Also, teens who are cyberbullied are more likely than other teens to have problems such as using drugs, skipping school, and even getting sick.

    If you are being cyberbullied, talk to an adult you trust.

    An adult can help you figure out how to handle the problem, and can offer you support.

    If you are cyberbullying, it’s time to stop.

    You are not only hurting someone else, you could hurt yourself. You can lose friends and get in trouble with your school or even with the police. If you can’t seem to stop yourself from cyberbullying, get help from an adult you trust.

    You may hurt someone online without really meaning to do it. It may seem funny to vote for the ugliest kid in school, for example, but try to think about how that person feels. And if you get a message that makes you mad, go away and come back before writing something you may regret. Nearly half of teenage cellphone users say they regretted a text message they sent. Remember, nothing is really secret or private on the Internet, and things you post online can stay there forever.

     

    [blockquote]

    Did you know?

    Teen girls say meanness lurks on social media. One out of 5 girls ages14 to 17 say people her age are mostly unkind to each other on social media. And one out of 3 girls ages 12 to 13 thought so. Ouch!
    Can you take a second to rewind and be kind before you post? [/blockquote]

     

    How to prevent cyberbullying?

    Here are some tips that may help protect you from being cyberbullied:

    • Don’t give out your passwords or personal information. Even your friends could wind up giving your passwords to someone who shouldn’t have them.
    • Use the privacy options on social networking sites like Facebook, Instagram, and Tumblr that let you choose who can see what you post.
    • Don’t friend people online if you don’t know them, even if you have friends in common.
    • Be careful about what you write or what images you send or post because nothing is really private on the Internet.
    • If you are using a site like Facebook on a computer in the library, log out before you walk away. If you don’t log out, the next person who uses the computer could get into your account.

     

    If you are cyberbullied arrow

    If you are cyberbullied, you can get help. Here are some important tips:

    • If someone bullies you, don’t respond. Bullies are looking for a reaction, and you may be able to stop the bullying if you ignore or block the person.
    • Save any evidence of cyberbullying, print it out, and show it to a trusted adult.
    • Use options that let you block email, cellphone, and text messages from a cyberbully. You can also stop a person from seeing your Facebook information. If you need help, ask an adult, your cellphone company, or the website where you want to block someone.
    • If you are being cyberbullied, ask if your school can get involved.
    • Report bullying to your Internet service provider, phone company, email provider, or the website where it happened. Sites like Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram have online forms for reporting.
    • Report cyberbullying to police if it involves threats of violence or pornography. Stopbullying.gov has more information on cyberbullying and the law.

    Sometimes, teens don’t want to tell their parents that they are being cyberbullied because they are afraid their parents will take away their phone or computer. If you have this concern, tell your parents, and work with them to figure out a solution. The most important thing is for you to be safe.

    Sexting and cyberbullying

    Sexting is sending naked or partly naked photos to someone online or by cellphone. Sometimes, a guy may pressure you to send these kinds of photos. Sometimes, friends may dare you to do it.

    It’s a very bad idea to send nude photos or forward someone else’s. Messages can be traced back to you, and photos can quickly get forwarded to a lot of people. You can really hurt someone’s feelings or your own reputation. You can even get in legal trouble for forwarding something that could be considered child pornography.

    From: Girls Health