Browsing Tag:

youth

  • Lifestyle

    Things to Consider When Dying Your Hair or Getting a Tattoo

    Things to Consider When Dying Your Hair or Getting a Tattoo

    Are you thinking about dying your hair a fun and exciting color? Is there a tattoo that you’re just dying to get? Just stop for a moment and consider your options. You’re probably young and hear adults telling you to wait until you’re older all the time. There may be some wisdom in that.

    I’m not here to tell you how to live your life, I am only here to give you some advice. When I was in high school there was this adorable tattoo that I wanted to drape across my collarbone. It was a myriad of water colors and had a quote by one of my favorite authors at the time. It seemed brilliant. I was determined to save my money and get it.

    Then came the realization that you had to be eighteen or older to get a tattoo. Or you could have adult approval. My parents were definitely not the type to give approval for a permanent marking on my body. They barely let me get my ears pierced at thirteen.

    Please, please, please do not try to deceive a tattoo artist or go to someone who is willing to do the job without parental consent. This is completely dangerous and illegal. Most tattoo artists will be able to tell right away if you’re lying, so you’re really only going to embarrass yourself. And if they don’t realize, then they are doing something illegal without knowing. You could be ruining both of your lives.

    To be honest, a tattoo artist that would tattoo you even with adult consent is either desperate for money or is sketchy. I have a decent number of friends that are or have been tattoo artists, so my advice does not come from a place of ignorance.

    Consider how a few years from now you may not even be into the same things you are now. I am grateful that I didn’t get the tattoo I originally wanted. It would have cost a lot of money and have been a lot to maintain. I wasn’t even responsible enough to maintain my cartilage piercings my senior year in high school. Each person is different, though.

    If you feel completely confident that in two or three years you will not regret your decision, then at least wait until you can legally get the artwork done by yourself. When you start making life decisions on your own like paying bills, choosing colleges, etc. you will be much more prepared to decide what goes on your body.

    Choosing a hair color is a little different. Your hair color can change as often as every six-eight weeks if you want. The advice I have for this is be aware of the chemicals you are putting on your head. I have been dying my hair since I was a senior in high school, so it has been several years. Sometimes I look back and regret my color choices, but anyone can regret hairstyle decisions from young ages. Thankfully, hair color is not permanent. But it can cause permanent damage if not done responsibly.

    If you bleach your hair, try to only do it every so many years. It is not safe to put such harsh chemicals in your hair. It is killing the strands and lasts for a long time. You can still have fun colors in your hair without bleaching it. Also, do not bleach your own head. Watch enough Youtube videos to see how disastrous that turns out. It’s hard to see all the places on your own head and you are not licensed to know all the downsides to it.

    Seek professional assistance when bleaching. Coloring your own hair can be done, but it is always a plus to have additional help. Try getting someone to help you your first few times or go have it colored professionally. It can be expensive to have someone do it for you, but sometimes it’s worth it.

    For additional advice on dying your hair or getting tattoos while young, check out the following links:

    https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/beauty/hair/a38165/how-young-is-too-young-to-color-hair/

    https://www.instyle.com/news/temporary-hair-color-tips-guide

    https://www.huffpost.com/entry/hair-dye-types-treatment-tips_n_4193049

    https://www.aftertheplayground.com/7-things-teen-needs-know-getting-tattoo/

  • Photography

    Being Comfortable in Your Own Skin

    Being Comfortable in Your Own Skin

    by Sarah Vice

    It has become so easy to tell people to stand up for themselves and to take the criticism surrounding their circumstances, but when it comes to your livelihood as a teenager, “coming out” may not be possible. If you live in a heavily religious home, or just a morally “traditional” homestead, then you have limited options to what sexual opportunities there are. I remember a friend of mine telling me that he was so scared to be homosexual that he quit school to be homeschooled to be away from other boys. A girl I knew in high school started hurting herself because she felt unable to love who she wanted to love, due to the fear of being kicked out of her home.

    In situations like these, we come back to the realization that sexual preference is not something everyone has access to. If you are stressed because of your home life, then reach out for help. Please do not consider harming yourself or others, when professionals are willing to spend time talking with you and helping you figure out a better way to express yourself.

    Here are some tips from me on what to do when you are feeling like a part of you is missing:

    1. Keep a journal. I know it sounds silly and may be difficult for some, but write down everything. If you find someone, you like, but do not have the courage or ability to reach out to them, write about it. Write a heavily detailed letter to your guardians about how what they’re doing is hurting you (you do not have to give this to them). This works just as well with art, or wood carving, or any other form of creativeness. Take your stress out on something that makes you happy.
    2. Keep close friends that understand who you truly are. This way you feel less like your hiding it from the world but are still able to keep it from your parents or guardians.
    3. Read books. There are a lot of authors who have probably experienced similar situations to yours. All you have to do is find them. (This works for television as well).
    4. Get an animal or thing that you can use as something to talk to. Animals relieve stress and are always there to listen. If owning a pet is something you don’t have access to, then have a stuffed animal or important relic to talk to.

    Before hiding who you are, always be sure to have conversations with your parents or guardians if you do not already know where they stand on the subject. Sometimes people can surprise you.

    If you ever feel alone in your struggle or would just like some company, you can check out the Magic City Acceptance Center at the following link:

    http://www.magiccityacceptancecenter.org/