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    Back To School – Women’s Education

    Back To School – Women’s Education

    In honor of back to school, I thought it would be nice to put things in the overall big picture of women’s education.

    See, education for women is actually pretty new, if you take a look at history. And even today it isn’t universal. We still have women campaigning for the right to an education in their country, such as Malala Yousafszi. Unfortunately, we don’t always get the names of the wonderful women from years past who fought for our right to learn. So, get ready for some fantastic women who helped fight for women’s education in the U.S. who mostly go below the radar.

    First up, we have Patsy Mink. When Mink was unable to go to law school and unable to get a job (both on the basis for being a woman), she dove into politics and worked hard and long for Title IX. After Title IX passed, opportunities in education opened up to millions of women in the United States.

    Fun Fact Patsy Mink was the first woman of color elected to Congress.

    Secondly, there’s Fanny Jackson Coppin. After Coppin was freed from slavery, she became one of the first women of color to earn a college degree. She then worked for 40 years as a principal at the Institute for Colored Youth in Philadelphia. As the Civil War came to an end, Coppin made it her life’s goal and mission to education many former slaves that were migrating to the north. Her work was some of the very beginning in the fight for equal education.

    Last, but definitely not least, is the Catholic Nuns. Catholic Nuns, through their education programs, moved millions of poor immigrants into the middle class. They were (and are still considered to be) the educators of the marginalized. They pushed women towards higher education, ran a nationwide system of schools, and had an overall enormous impact on education in the United States.

     

    Thanks to these people, women’s education has really taken off, and we have the opportunities today that wouldn’t have even been a dream 100 years ago. Clearly, this is not the end of the list. So many women have helped campaign for women’s education worldwide; too many people to name. So, keep these women in mind as you collect your books and pack your bag. Equal education has come a long way, we sure have a lot to be grateful for!

     

    Want to read more about people that helped women’s education ? –

    Women’s History Month: These Female Trailblazers Changed American Education For You and Your Kids. Do You Know Their Names?

  • Photography, Woman's History

    Alabama’s Finest Female: Autherine Lucy Foster

    Autherine Lucy Foster was the first black student to be admitted to an all-white public school or university in the entire state of Alabama. Foster was recently honored by The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa on September 17, 2017. The university asked Autherine Lucy to speak about her experiences, and the enormous obstacles she has overcome to get to where she is today. She was then presented with a campus landmark dedicated in her name, on The University of Alabama’s Graves’ lawn. Foster’s actions and determination to actively make change in a prejudiced society have paved the way of civil equality today.
    Foster’s success has become an inspiration to many African-Americans worldwide. Autherine Lucy Foster who is currently 87, attempted to enroll at The University of Alabama in 1952. She was originally accepted, until admissions found out that she was African-American. Attorneys fought for Foster’s right to attend the university, and about a year later she was admitted into the school. Not even one hundred years ago, Foster was the first African-American student to attend a public university.
    Unfortunately it does not end there, Foster’s education at Alabama was cut short. Less than a week into her attendance at the university, Foster was harassed on campus and bombarded with endless threats. When Foster spoke on September 17, she talked about her experience of the 3000 Klansmen waiting for her to step outside and chanting racial statements at her. Foster was suspended for “her safety, and the safety of other students,” and she was later on expelled.
    Over thirty years later, her expulsion was finally annulled and Foster returned to the University of Alabama and earned her Master’s degree in education. Foster’s ambition and actions have left an impact on Alabama, and on the entire nation. Her courage to fight against social injustice at the university has qualified her a legacy on the campus. Foster truly is an inspiration, and an empowering woman to look up to. She has strived for greatness, and continues to impact lives of many students.

  • Photography, Woman's History

    Six Historic Firsts From This Year’s Election You Might Have Missed

    Nevada elected the first Latina senator in US history.

    Catherine Cortez Masto defeated Republican Joe Heck in the race for the Nevada Senate seat. She’s the first Latina senator in US history. She’s a former Nevada attorney general and granddaughter of a Mexican immigrant. Her campaign was focused on an immigration overhaul and future Supreme Court picks.

    California elected the first Indian-American to serve in the US Senate.

    California’s Attorney General Kamala Harris defeated a fellow Democrat by a little more than a third the vote and was backed by both President Obama and Vice President Biden. She’s mixed race, born to an Indian mother and a Jamaican-American father. She’s now the first black US senator from California, second black woman to serve as senator, and first Indian-American senator.

    Florida elected the first Vietnamese-American woman to Congress.

    Stephanie Murphy was also endorsed by both Obama and Biden, along with the Human Rights Campaign. She’s the daughter of Vietnamese refugees and immigrated to the US when she was 1 year old. She defeated a 23-year Republican incumbent and is now the first Vietnamese-American woman to grab a spot in Congress.

    Oregon elected the US’s first LGBT governor.

    Oregon is the first state to elect an openly LGBT governor. Kate Brown stepped in as governor of Oregon back in 2015, after the previous governor stepped down. But Brown properly ran this year, and won, becoming the first openly LGBT person to win a gubernatorial election. Brown was outed by The Oregonian for being bisexual in mid-90s. She’s currently married with two stepchildren.

    Washington elected the first Indian-American woman to hold a seat in the US House of Representatives.

    Washington’s Pramila Jayapal is the first Indian-American woman to hold a seat in the House of Representatives. Jayapal defeated a fellow Democratic opponent with more than half of the vote. She was born in India and immigrated to the US when she was a teenager. After 9/11, she founded an advocacy group for immigrants and refugees who live in the US.

    CORRECTIONS

    Kamala Harris is the second black woman to be elected to the US Senate. A previous version indicated that she was the second black senator to ever serve in Congress.

    Stephanie Murphy defeated a 23-year Republican incumbent. A previous version incorrectly indicated her opponent was 23-years-old.
    Nov. 9, 2016, at 9:50 a.m.

    Article From: Buzzfeed

    Here is a list of a few more woman who made history:

    1. Zena Stephens, the first black female sheriff ever elected in the Lone Star State.

    2. Tammy Duckworth, Democratic senator for Illinois.

    3. Former California Attorney General Kamala Harris becomes the state’s first senator of Indian descent — and the country’s first black female senator since 1999. She succeeds Barbara Boxer. The Democrat, along with Duckworth, is biracial, another first for the national legislature. Her mother is Indian, and her father is from Jamaica.

    4. Maggie Hassan, another Democrat, unseated her Republican rival Kelly Ayotte in the New Hampshire Senate race.

    5. Former Vice President Dick Cheney’s daughter, Liz Cheney won in Wyoming.

    Article From: CNN

    Hillary Clinton’s Message to Young Girls

  • Articles, Confidence, Woman's History

    My Women’s March Experience

    In celebration of Women’s History month, I have decided to submit an article that I wrote after going to the 2017 women’s march on Washington in Birmingham. I think that the Women’s marches that occurred earlier this year will be remembered during March in many years to come.

    Last Saturday I attended the Women’s march on Birmingham. My mom had made a sign; she was the one who really convinced me to go. It (the sign) was quite well made, with letters printed from vinyl spelling out “WOMEN’S RIGHTS ARE HUMAN RIGHTS” proudly across the colorful poster board She forgot to cut the apostrophe out of vinyl, so we had to add it later with a ballpoint pen. I don’t think anyone noticed, though.

    5,000. That was the estimated number of people who came. 10,000 feet marching. I didn’t expect so many people to march. In fact, I was considerably skeptical about the whole thing at first. I thought,” What difference can it make?” and “If I don’t go, will it really matter?” But, the experience of walking alongside thousands of fellow humans all united for a common cause (as millions did so around our country) was what really changed my mind.

    I arrived with my parents in my dad’s black Ford about 30 minutes before the speakers were scheduled to take the stage. We had to park in a lot a few blocks away from Kelly Ingram park, on account of the tremendous number of cars that had poured in for the sole purpose of transporting people to the march. That’s why I wasn’t that upset that we had to park in a less convenient spot, as I knew that the lack of parking spaces meant that more people were getting out and doing something.

    As we paid our parking fee, kind people spoke to us as if we were their best friends. They asked us if we were going to the march, and were so neighborly and cordial. That was my first experience with the genuine love that was radiating from everyone at the march, heard through confident footsteps and wide, welcoming smiles and echoing throughout the city. I think that feeling may have echoed throughout the entire country that day.

    After paying for parking we strode to where everyone was collecting, seeing others on the streets with signs in hand doing the same.

    Once we reached out destination I finally realized the magnitude of this gathering. A flock of activists being active, all happily conversing and anticipating the march. I could feel the energy, poetic and passionate, the excitement in the air. As I walked around, waving hello to faces I recognized, a teen girl about my age high fived me. Did I wonder why, why this friendly display of comradery? Maybe it was the rainbow I had painted (with watered down eyeshadow) across my cheek, or the “youth pride” button I had pinned to my chest. Maybe it was that I was just there. Yes, I think it was the latter.

    The speakers spoke for a relatively long time, once they finally called everyone to attention. The crowd was large and impatient for the march to start, hoisting up their signs in recognition of words or phrases they signified with. Some songs were sung, but there was a silent consensus among the group that we all just wanted to start marching.

    Finally, I was time to march. I was careful not to lose my parents in the crowd as it shifted to facing toward the road and made its way to the march’s starting point. The mass was dense, so much so that it was hard for me to see exactly where we were heading but I shuffled along with everyone else nevertheless. Then my foot stepped onto the concrete road as my hand was curled, fist like around my sign, and I began to march.

    The march was powerful. It was lively, colorful, happy, and invigorating. It was a brilliant display of human unity. I knew this right as I stepped into Kelly Ingram park when all my skepticism left me. We flew through the streets, birds in motion, out vibrant wings pigmented with the hues of our hearts. It was utterly massive. As I walked down one street I could see another portion of the group marching down another. We were a chain, curling and weaving around streets and parks and parking lots. Everyone joined together. Strong. We chanted and sang, those without signs held up fists, all our voices melting into one. Being part of this march really changed my viewpoints that I had previously had. I don’t wonder if I can make a difference anymore. No, I tell myself I must.