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acne

  • Puberty, Sexual Health, Teen Pregnancy

    We all go through it…The Change

    Puberty – How Your Body Changes

    Your body is changing; your moods may be unpredictable and sometimes hard to explain. Don’t worry. These changes are normal. Our guide to teen health is designed to help you understand the common physical and emotional changes you are going through, and deal responsibly with new personal and social situations you may encounter. These changes are called puberty.

    Puberty lasts for several years and marks the life stage when your body is changing from a child to an adult. Hormones help trigger and guide this process. Hormones are natural chemicals in your body that produce gradual physical changes during this time and may also cause emotional changes that can sometimes seem uncontrollable. These changes are common during puberty, and they happen to everyone. Although it may seem that these changes and feelings are out of your control, don’t worry—you’re still you, just the “growing up” version.

    Common Physical Changes in Girls

    Girls going through puberty often notice physical changes, such as larger breasts, hair growth in new places, acne and changes in the shape of your hips, waste, bottom and thighs. Below are some of the common physical changes you may experience.

    Menstrual Periods & PMS

    Menstruation is a turning point in your development from a child to a teenager. It’s important to remember that this is natural and something that makes being a woman special.

    Larger Breasts

    One of the first changes you will notice are your breasts growing, usually between the ages of eight and 12. Once your breasts start growing, you will most likely want to buy a bra.

    Common Social and Emotional Issues

    Today’s young women face many emotional and social challenges during puberty. Below are some of the common tough issues you may find, and tips for handling them.

    Self Esteem & Peer Pressure

    The foundation for positive self-esteem is built at an early age and is influenced by relationships between you and your family. Your feelings about yourself will change as you grow.

    Sex & Sexually Transmitted Diseases

    When to engage or not engage in sexual relations is one of the most important decisions a person can make. From getting pregnant to becoming infected with an STD, make sure you understand the risks.

    Mental Health & Abuse

    Overall health means more than simply being in shape and eating properly. Mental health, which includes your thoughts and feelings, is just as important as physical health.

    Hair Growth

    Hair will start to grow under your arms, on your legs and on your pubic area. Shaving your underarms and legs is a personal choice, but talk about it with one of your parents first.

    Acne

    This aggravating condition may be mild (blackheads and whiteheads), moderate (larger inflamed-looking blemishes) or severe (large cysts or nodules). Acne is caused by a build-up of oil, microorganisms and dead skin cells in the hair follicles under the skin.

    Eating Disorders

    With a more prevalent preoccupation with appearance and weight in today’s society, girls may be at risk to develop eating disorders.

     

    Substance Abuse

    During your teenage years, it is a good idea to take some risks, like trying new activities or sports. However, some risk-taking behaviors, such as drinking alcohol, smoking and using drugs have negative effects.

     

    Visiting Your Doctor

    Before the onset of puberty, discuss your questions and concerns with your health care professional. It is also a time for you to gather printed material on a variety of health issues, including your menstrual cycle, contraception and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

  • Articles, TRENDING

    Beck Lomas shares no-makeup selfie with acne: ‘No one is completely perfect’

    On September 26, she posted a vulnerable, no-makeup selfie to encourage her followers to embrace their natural beauty.

    “THIS is my current situation. A pimply, bleeding, sore face,” she wrote in the caption. “My skin will always be a journey in itself, I don’t think I will ever be one of those girls who feels completely okay without makeup, but that’s fine….But just because I’m not completely confident with my skin, doesn’t mean I’m not a confident person. I’ve come a long way from the girl who used to cry every single night about the way her skin looked. These days my skin is just a minor downer for me sometimes.”

    Lomas added that many women are too hard on themselves for what they view as imperfections.

    “No one is completely perfect, and something that might seem like the end of the world for you, may go unnoticed by everyone else,” she wrote. “Happy people are the most beautiful people, and I know it’s hard to feel happy when you’re focusing on your imperfections—but I just want to let you all know that you are beautiful EVEN if you have acne, or bacne, or cellulite, or your thighs touch or you’ve got stretch marks.”

    After Lomas posted her honest account, support poured in from her 156,000 Instagram followers.

    “Just wanted to say a quick THANK YOU for this post,” one fan commented. “My skin is exactly the same as yours and I struggle with it daily—this was such a great reminder that our imperfections don’t define us. Thank you for being so honest and relatable.”

    Her followers were just as supportive when Lomas posted another no-makeup selfie a few days ago, this one with clearer skin.

    “Smiling today because I’m finally feeling confident and happy with my skin,” Lomas wrote under the recent photo. “It might not last, because my skin has been known to take an unexpected turn for the worst when it’s feeling it’s best, but for the moment I’m happy…after all of this, at this present point in time, I’m finally at a point where I am confident without makeup.”

    Lomas’s fans loved her latest body-positive photo, and for being so honest about her circumstances.

    “What I love about your Instagram is your honesty and that you show us the REAL you,” one woman commented.

    “This is so many people’s reality, including my own,” another fan said. “Thank you for being so brave and honest! Your skin is beautiful and you are an inspiration!”

    Lomas said that by opening up about her skin struggles, she hopes to help other women feel better about their own insecurities.

    “Seeing photo after photo of girls in magazines or on TV or on social media because they have such beautiful smooth skin without an imperfection in sight, it’s hard to not feel self conscious when your own skin is imperfect,” she wrote. “To anyone else who is struggling with skin issues—you aren’t alone and things will get better, so just hang in there!”

  • Puberty

    Puberty: Changes for Females

    Puberty: Changes for Females

    Puberty – it’s a crazy time. Your body’s changing, and so is everything else. But, what is causing all these changes?

    You know how everyone says that puberty is all about raging hormones? It’s kind of true. Hormones that were hibernating suddenly awaken and signal your body to enter puberty. You might think this doesn’t mean a lot, but hormones cause the changes that are associated with puberty.

    Timing of Puberty

    Puberty starts at different times and lasts for different periods of time for everyone. It can start as early as 8 years of age to as late as 13 years of age. The sequence of puberty – from breast development to complete physical maturation – may take a year and a half or last as long as 6 years.

    This is sometimes very difficult for girls as some of their peers may have entered and completed puberty before they have even started. However, there is no way to slow or speed up the process, but puberty happens to everyone, so never fear, it will happen to you!

    You may have heard that girls mature more quickly than guys, and that is somewhat true, since girls usually enter puberty about 2 years earlier than boys.

    Below is a general time line for physical changes that occur during puberty (for girls):

    Growth of Breasts
    8 – 13 Years Old

    Growth of pubic hair
    8 – 14 Years Old

    Body Growth
    9 1/2 – 14 1/2 Years Old

    First Period
    10 – 16 1/2 Years Old

    Underarm Hair
    2 years after pubic hair shows up

    Acne
    Around the same time as underarm hair

    Remember, puberty is not the same for everyone, so some girls will grow pubic hair before they develop breasts, and that is absolutely normal.

    Breasts

    Breast development begins between 8 years of age and 13 years of age and continues through puberty.

    Breast development starts with the flat area around the nipple (areola) becoming enlarged and some breast tissue forming under the nipple. When breast development is complete, each breast is distinct and the areola no longer appears swollen.

    Breast size varies from woman to woman, and there is no way to try to make your breasts larger or smaller other than going through plastic surgery, which is not always a very safe or healthy alternative.

    Pubic Hair

    Pubic hair starts along the vaginal lips, the outer opening of your private parts. The hair becomes darker and coarser and grows like an inverted triangle. Sometimes, the hair spreads to the insides of thighs, as well.

    Growing

    Puberty also causes you to go through a growth spurt, which results in an average growth of about 3.5 inches a year.

    Your head, hands, and feet are the first things to grow. Then you grow in your arms and legs, and finally your torso and shoulders catch up with the rest of your body.

    If it’s any consolation, everyone goes through that awkward phase, so you are not alone! Height growth is, of course, accompanied by an increase in weight.

    This weight gain is perfectly normal and a part of puberty. Without gaining this weight, you cannot grow taller, develop breasts, or get your first period.

    Acne

    Finally, underarm hair begins to grow, and your sweat and oil producing glands also start developing, which eventually results in acne when these glands are clogged.

    In order to avoid breakouts, you should wash your face twice daily. If you still regularly break out, you may want to speak to a dermatologist.

    From: Sutter Health

     

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